The Norton Anthology Of American Literature - Volume A - ~...

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Unformatted text preview: ~~ 0J .1. , U .1.. 1..,A.I. (;.,If oj Boston 1630 NARRAGANSE1T PEQUOT .a........,.....,. to 1700 ,\f,,im• ~ Pl,.mouth J620 c,trre <·,.1 .L .:L.A.AA...... .&. 0 500 o 3 15{)() k 1000 1-l-----.}.'-----rr'-'-----r,' bo 600 900 n1i Albany 161-1 ME New \ork 1624 ( 'lu••utpeilht• J\N n.n ~ Jameslown 1607 --Roanoke c·,, 1.,. Island ll,ltft'hl\ \.i 0 I 580s ,, ,, ~o\ \ 0 300L:m I I 0 I lOOmile AfRIC s ,. 600km I 0 .alwmitn (;) tl 0 I 15()0 I I .~OOOLn I wwnorton.com/naal The StudySpace site that accompanies The Norton Anthology of American Literature is FREE, but you will need the code below to register for a password that will allow you to access the copyrighted materials on the site. AMER-ICAN THE NORTON ANTHOLOGY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE EIGHTH EDITION VOLUM[ .-\: fl[CfNNfNCS TO J,'QO I I ,I L----- I i ·;,;;;,;;··-·-~~~·--=-·---=--=---;;;,.;;;--=--=--=___j= VOLUME A Beginnings to 1700 • FAANW.'II American literature 170o-1820 • o.;v. Native American literatures • KRL'R\T VOLUME B American literature 182o-1865 • UVlr-.1 • KRI.;li\T VOLUME C American literature 1865-1914 • MYM • L£\1NE • VOLUME D American literature 1914-1945 LOEFfELHOLZ VOLUME E American literature since 1945 KUNKOWITZ • WAllACE KRUAAT • REESMAN Wayne Franklin PROfi.SSOR A.~ 1100. INCI.IS/1 l.N\tRSITY Of CON'\tCTICVT Philip F. Gura \'IIUI'..~I S. 1>{\VM-'N OISTINC\.1511£0 PROfi.SSOR Of IIMfRICA.'I UTEIIATI.illf A.'D 0..\TI.illf Uf'.MRSITY OF NOirnl CAROU'I'.. CtW'fl Hill Jerome Kllnkowitz UNMRSITY DISTINCUISII!D SCIIOLAA ""'D PROftsSOR OF [NGUSII l:r-.MRSITY Of NORTHERN IOWA Arnold Krupat PROftsSOR Of UT[IIAT\..Itf WWI IA\\1tENCl OOlUCI: Robert S. levine PROfi.SSOR Of I.NCliSII A.'I) DISTl'Q..1SitEO SO tOlAR-TfAOIER U.MRSITY Of MAR\tA.'I).COll(Gl 1\UJ\ Mary Loeffelholz PROflSSOROf lNGIIS/1 NORTitfASTIRN I.NMRSITY Jeanne Campbell Reesman I'ROftsSOR Of lNGUStl I.NMRSITY Of Tr.XASAT S"-'1 ANTONIO Patricia B. Wallace THE NORTON ANTHOLOGY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE __________ , ---- -~- ~ ........ -,..__<•·-..-~--- EIGHTH EDITION Nina Baym. General Editor SWANLUND CHAIR AND CENTER FOR ADVANCED STUDY PROFESSOR EMERITA OF ENGLISH JUBILEE PROFESSOR OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign RobertS. Levine. Associate General Editor PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH AND DISTINGUISHED SCHOLAR-TEACHER University of Maryland. College Park VOLUME A: I3EGIN1\liNGS TO 1820 W • W ·NORTON NEW &. COMPANY YORK • LONDON \'V. \V. Norton & Company has been independent since its founding in 1923, when \Villiam Warder Norton and l\lary D. Herter Norton first published lectures delivered at the Peo· pie's Institute, the adult education dh•ision of New York City's Cooper Union. The firm soon expanded its program beyond the Institute, publishing hooks by celebrated academics from America and abroad. By midcentur)', the two major pillars of Norton's publishing programtrade books and college texts-were firmly estahlished. In the l9';0s, the Norton family transferred control of the company to its employees, and toda)·-with a staff of four hun· dred and a comparahle number of trade, college, and professional titles published each year-\\1• W. Norton & Company stands as the largest and oldest publishing house owned wholly by its employees. Eclitor: Julia Reidhead :\ssociale Editor: Carly Fraser Doria Mauagiug Editor, College: Marian Johnson Marwscript Editors: Michael Fleming. Candace levy, Katharine lngs, Susan Joseph Electrouic Media Editor: Eileen Connell Prmlucticm Mauager: Benjamin Reynolds Marketiug Mauager, Literature: Kimberly Bowers Plwto Editor: Stephanie Romeo Plloto Researclr: Jane Sanders Miller Permissious Mauager: Megan Jackson Permissiom Cleariug: ;\largaret Gorenstein Te:~:t Desigu: JoAnne ;\Ietsch Art Director: Rubina Yeh Compositiom The Westchester Book Group ,\Jauufacturiug: R. R. Donnelley & Sons-Crawfordsville. IN The text of this book is composed in Fairfield Medium with the display set in Aperto. Copyright© 2012, 2007, 2003, 1998, 1994, 1989, 1985, 1979 by W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. All rights reserved. Printed in the United Stales of America. Since this page cnnnot legibly accommodate all the copyright notices, the Permissions Acknowledgments constitute an extension of the copyright page. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data has been applied for. ISBN 978-0-393-93476-2 W. W. Norton & Company. Inc., 500 Fifth Avenue. New York, NY 10110-0017 wwnorton.com W. W. Norton & Compan)' Ltd., Castle llouse, 75/i6 Wells Street, London WIT 3QT 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 Contents li ll PREFACE xvii ACKNOWLEDGMENTS xxvii Beginnings to 1700 INTRODUCTION 3 TII\1ELINE 19 STORIES OF THE BEGINNING OF THE WORLD 21 The Iroquois Creation Story 21 The Navajo Creation Story 25 Hajffner (The Emergence) 26 CHRISTOPHER CoLUMBUS (1451-1506) 34 From Letter to Luis de Santangel Regarding the First Voyage (February 15, 1493) 35 From Letter to Ferdinand and Isabella Regarding the Fourth Voyage (July 7, 1503) 36 BARTOLOME DE LAS CASAS (1474-1566) 38 The Very Brief Relation of the Devastation of the Indies 39 From Hispaniola 39 From The Coast of Pearls, Paria, and the Island of Trinidad 41 ALvAR NuNEZ CABEZA DE VAcA (c. 1490-1558) 43 The Relation of Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca H [Dedication) 44 [The l\lalhado Way of Life) 45 [Our Life among the Avavares and Arbadaos) 4i [Pushing On) 48 [Customs of That Region] 48 [The First Confrontation) 49 [The Falling-Out with Our Countrymen] 50 vii I CONTENTS viii FIRST ENCOUNTERS: EARLY EUROPEAN ACCOUNTS OF NATIVE AMERICA HERNAN CORTES: Second Letter to the Spanish Crown {Description ofTenochtitlan] 54 SAMUEL DE CHAMPLAIN: The Voyages of Sieur de Champlain [The Iroquois) 59 ROBERT JUET: From The Third Voyage of Master Henry Hudson JOHN HECKEWELDER: History, Manners, and Customs of the Indian Nations [Delaware Legend of Hudson's Arrival) 6H 52 54 59 64 68 WILLIAM BRADFORD AND EDWARD WINSLOW: Mourt's Relation [Cape Cod Forays) i2 JOHN UNDERHILL: News from America [The Attack on Pequot Fort) 75 joHN SMITH (158o-I63I) 71 81 The General History of Virginia, New England, and the Summer Isles 83 The Third Book. From Chapter 2. What Happened till the First Supply 83 The Fourth Book. [Smith's Farewell to Virginia) 93 From A Description of New England 93 From New England's Trials 96 NATIVE AMERICAN TRICKSTER TALES WINNEBAGO 100 101 Felix White Sr.'s Introduction to Wakjankaga 102 (transcribed and translated by Kathleen Dunker and Felix White) From The Winnebago Trickster Cycle (edited by Paul Radin) 105 SIOUX Ill Ikto Conquers lya, the Eater (transcribed and edited by Ella C. Deloria) 112 NAVAJO Coyote, Skunk, and the Prairie Dogs (performed by Hugh Yellowman; recorded and translated by Barre Toelken) 115 114 CONTENTS WILLIAM BRADFORD (1590-1657) lx 121 Of Plymouth Plantation 122 Book I 122 From Chapter I [The English Reformation] 122 Chapter IV. Showing the Reasons and Causes or"I'heir Removal 124 From Chapter VII. Of Their Departure from Leyden 127 Chapter IX. Of Their Voyage, and How They Passed the Sea; and of Their Safe Arrival at Cape Cod 131 Chapter X. Showing How They Sought Out a Place of Habitation; and What Befell Them Thereabout 134 Book II 138 Chapter XI. The Remainder of Anno 1620 138 [Difficult Beginnings) 139 [Dealings with the Natives) 140 Chapter XII. Anno 1621 [The First Thanksgiving) 144 Chapter XIX. Anno 162H [Mr. Morton of Merrymount) 144 Chapter XXIII. Anno 1632 [Prosperity Weakens Community) 147 Chapter XXV. Anno 1634 [Troubles to the West] 148 Chapter XXVII. Anno 1636 [War Threats) 150 Chapter XXVIII. Anno 1637 [War with the Pequots) 152 Chapter XXXII. Anno 1642 [A Horrible Truth) 154 Chapter XXXIV. Anno 1644 [Proposed Removal to Nauset) 1% THOMAS MORTON (c. 1579-1647) 157 New English Canaan 158 The Third Book [The Incident at Merry Mount) 158 Chapter XIV. Of the Revels of New Canaan 158 Chapter XV. Of a Great Monster Supposed to Be at 1\la-re Mount 161 Chapter XVI. How the Nine Worthies Put Mine Host of Ma-re Mount into the Enchanted Castle at Plymouth 164 jOHN WINTHROP (1588-1649) 165 A Model of Christian Charity 166 From The Journal of John Winthrop 177 THE BAY PsALM BooK Psalm Psalm Psalm Psalm Psalm Psalm 2 ["Why rage the Heathen furiously?"] 188 19 ['The heavens do declare"] 189 23 ("The Lord to me a shepherd is"] 190 24 ('The earth Jehovah's is"] 190 100 ["i\lake yea joyful sounding noise") 191 120 ("Unto the Lord. in my distress"] 192 186 x CONTENTS 193 A Key into the Language of America 194 'Jo l\ly Dear and Well-Beloved Friends and Countrymen, in Old and New England 194 Directions for the Use of Language 198 An Help to the Nati\•e Language 198 From Chapter I. Of Salutation 198 From Chapter II. Of Eating and Entertainment 199 From Chapter VI. Of the Family and Business of the House 199 From Chapter XI. Of Travel 199 From Chapter XVIII. Of the Sea 200 From XXI. Of Religion, the Soul, etc. 200 Poem ("Two sorts of men shall naked stand"! 203 From Chapter XXX. Of Their Paintings 204 From The Bloody Tenet of Persecution 204 A Letter to the Town of Providence 206 ANNE BRADSTREET (c. 1612-1672) 207 The Prologue 208 In Honor of that High and Mighty Princess Queen Elizabeth of Happy Memory 209 To the Memory of My Dear and Ever Honored Father Thomas Dudley Esq. 213 To Her Father with Some Verses 215 Contemplations 215 The Flesh and the Spirit 222 The Author to Her Book 225 Before the Birth of One of Her Children 225 To My Dear and LO\·ing Husband 226 A Letter to Her Husband, Absent upon Public Employment 226 Another [Letter to Her Husband, Absent upon Public Employment I 227 In Reference to Her Children, 23 June 1659 228 In Memory of My Dear Grandchild Elizabeth Bradstreet 230 In Memory of My Dear Grandchild Anne Bradstreet 230 On My Dear Grandchild Simon Bradstreet 231 For Deliverance from a Fever 231 Here Follows Some Verses upon the Burning of Our House 232 As Weary Pilgrim 233 To l\'ly Dear Children 235 MICHAEL WIGGLESWORTH (1631-1705) From The Day of Doom 239 MARY ROWLANDSON (c. 1637-1711) A Narrative of the Capth•ity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson 257 238 CONTENTS xl EDWARD TAYLOR (c. 1642-1729) Psalm Two (First Version) 290 Preparatory Meditations 291 Prologue 291 Meditation 8 (First Series) 292 i\leditation 16 (first Series) 293 i\leditation 22 (first Series) 294 i\leditation 38 (First Series) 295 Meditation 26 (Second Series) 297 God's Determinations 298 The Preface 298 The Soul's Groan to Christ for Succor 299 Christ's Reply 300 Upon Wedlock, and Death of Children 303 Upon a Wasp Chilled with Cold 304 Huswifery 305 A Fig for Thee, Oh! Death 306 289 SAMUEL SEWALL (1652-1730) From The Diary of Samuel Sewall 309 The Selling of Joseph: A Memorial 323 307 327 CoTTON MATHER (1663-1728) The Wonders of the Invisible World 328 [A People of God in the Devil's Territories) 328 [The Trial of Martha Carrier) 330 Magnalia Christi Americana 333 Galeacius Secuudus: The Life of William Bradford Esq., Governor of Plymouth Colony 333 Nelremias Americcmus: The Life of John Winthrop, Esq., Go\·ernor of the Massachusetts Colony 340 A Notable Exploit: Dux Fremiua Facti 354 Bonifacius 356 From Essays to Do Good 356 xll CONTENTS American Literature 1700-1820 INTRODUCTION 365 TIMELJNf. 3ii SARAH KEMBLE KNJGtiT (1666-1727) .~i9 The Private Journal of a Journey from Boston to New York 380 From Tuesday, October the Third 380 Friday, October the Sixth 3!B Saturday, October the Seventh 3H4 From December the Sixth 387 January the Sixth 389 vVILLIAi\1 BYRD (•6 74 -. 744 ) 39o From The Secret Diary of William Byrd of Westover, 1710-12 391 jONATHAN EDWAHDS (1703-1758) 396 Personal Narrati\'e 398 On Sarah Pierpont 409 Sarah Edwards's Narrati\'e 409 A Di\'ine and Supernatural Light 416 Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God 430 NATIVE AMERICANS: CONTACT AND CONFLICT Speech at Detroit SAMSON OCCOM: From A Short Narrative of My Life THOI\IAS JEFFERSON: Chief Logan's Speech, from Notes 011 the State ofVirRiuia HED JACKET: Reply to the lVIissionary Jacob Cram TECUMSEH: Speech to the Osages PONTIAC: BENJAMIN FRANKLIN (1706-1790) The Way to Wealth 45i The Speech of .Miss Polly llaker 463 Rules hy Which a Great Empire i\hty Be Heduced to a Small One 465 Information to Those \Vho Would Hemo\'e to America 4il Remarks Concerning the S~tvages of North America 4i6 The Autobiography 480 joHN WooLMAN (1720-1772) The Journal of John Woolman 'i97 [Early Life and Vocation! 'i97 442 44.~ 44'i 448 4'i0 4'i3 4'i5 CONTENTS j. HECTOR ST. jOHN DE CREVECOEUR (I735-I8I3) XIII 604 Letters from an American Farmer 605 From Letter Ill. What Is an American 605 From Letter IX. Description of Charles-Town; Thoughts on Slavery; on Physical Evil; A Melancholy Scene 614 From Letter X. On Snakes; and on the Humming Bird 619 From Letter XII. Distresses of a Frontier J\lan 620 jOHN ADAMS (I735-I826) AND ABIGAIL ADAMS (I744-I818) 625 The Letters 626 Abigail Adams to John Adams (Aug. 19, 1774) [Classical Parallels] 626 John Adams to Abigail Adams (Sept. 16, 1774) [Prayers at the Congress] 628 John Adams to Abigail Adams (July 23, 1775) [Dr. Franklin] 629 John Adams to Abigail Adams (Oct. 29, 1775) [Prejudice in Favor of New England] 630 Abigail Adams to John Adams (Nov. 27, 1775) [The Building Up a Great Empire] 631 John Adams to Abigail Adams (July 3, 1776) [These colonies are free and independent states] 632 John Adams to Abigail Adams (July 3, 1776) [Reflections on the Declaration of Independence) 634 Abigail Adams to John Adams (July 14, 1776) [The Declaration. Smallpox. The Grey Horse) 635 John Adams to Abigail Adams (July 20, 1776) [Do My Friends Think I Have Forgotten My Wife and Children?) 63i Abigail Adams to John Adams (july 21, 1776) [Smallpox. The Proclamation for Independence Read Aloud) 63i THOMAS PAINE (1737-1809) 639 Common Sense 641 Introduction 641 From Ill. Thoughts on the Present State of American Affairs 641 The Crisis, No. I 64i The Age of Reason 653 Chapter I. The Author's Profession of Faith 653 Chapter II. Of J\lissions and Re\·elations 654 Chapter XI. Of the Theology of the Christians, and the True Theology 656 THOMAS jEFFERSON (I743-I826) The Autobiography of Thomas Jefferson 661 From The Declaration of Independence 661 Notes on the State of Virginia 668 Query V. Cascades [Natural Bridge] 668 659 xlv CONTENTS Query XIV. Laws [Slavery) 669 Query XVII. [Religion) 6i3 Query XIX [Manufactures) 676 677 THE FEDERALIST No. I [Alexander Hamilton) 679 No. 10 [James Madison] 681 0LAUDAH EQUIANO (174;?-1797) 687 The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavas Vassa, the African, Written by Himself 688 From Chapter I 688 Chapter II 690 From Chapter III 699 From Chapter IV 702 From Chapter V 706 From Chapter VI 709 From Chapter VII 718 WOMEN'S POETRY: FROI\I MANUSCRIPT TO PRINT JANE COLMAN TURELL 722 723 To l\Ir l\luse, December 29, 1725 723 [Lines on Childbirth] 724 ANNIS BOUDINOT STOCKTON 725 To My Burrissa- 725 An Ode on the Birth Day ... of George Washington i26 SARAH WENTWORTH i\IORTON 727 The African Chief 728 Stanzas to a Husband Recently United 730 MERCY OTIS WARREN 731 A Thought on the Inestimable Blessing of Reason 731 [Prologue for Lines] To a Patriotic Gentleman 732 ANN ELIZA BLEECKER 733 On the Immensity of Creation 734 To l\liss l\1. V. W. 734 MARGARETTA FAUGERES 736 To Aribert. October, 1790 736 jUDITH SARGENT MuRRAY (r7;r-182o) On the Equality of the Sexes 739 The Gleaner 747 Chapter XI 747 [History of Miss Wellwoodl 747 737 CONTENTS PHILIP fRENEAU (1752-1832) xv 756 The Wild Honey Suckle 7';7 The Indian Burying Ground 758 To Sir Toby 759 On i\lr. Paine's Bights of Man 760 On the Religion of N<1ture 762 PHILLIS WHEATLEY (c. 1753-1784) 763 On Being Brought from t\rrica to America 764 To the Right Honourable William, Earl of Dartmouth 765 To the Uni\'ersity of Cambridge, in New England 766 On the Death of the Re\'. 1\lr. George Whitefield, liiO 767 Thoughts on the Works of Prm·idence 76R To S. 1\1., a Young African Painter, on Seeing His Works 771 To His Excellency General Washington 772 Letters 773 To John Thornton (Ailr· 21, 1772) 773 To He\'. Samson Occom (Feb. II, li74) 774 RoYALL TYLER (1757-1826) 775 The Contrast 776 HANNAH WERSTEn FosTEn (1758-J84o) 817 The Coc1uette; or, The History of Elizn Wharton 818 CuAnLES BnocKDEN BnowN (1771-181o) Edgar Huntly 91H Chapter IV 91H Chapter V 923 Chapter VI 9.H Ch<~pter VII 934 Chapter V Ill 939 SEI.ECTED IIInLIOGitt\I'IIIES t\1 BEGINNINGS TO 1700 AI 1700-1820 t\7 PERMISSIONS ACKNOWLEDGMENTS All INDEX t\12 916 Preface to the Eighth Edition This edition of The Norton Antltology of American Literature is the last for me as General Editor, and I am delighted to announce that Robert S. Levine, the editor of Volume B, will take over as General Editor for the next and subsequent editions. Here he joins me as Associate Editor; together we have continued the work for which Norton has achieved its leading position among American literature anthologies. It has been a great pleasure to work on this anthology, to make contact with teachers and students around the countryindeed around the world. I know I leave Tlte Norton Anthology of American Literature in immensely capable hands. From the anthology's inception in 1979, the editors have had three main aims: first, to present a rich and substantial enough variety of works to enable teachers to build courses according to their own ideals (thus, teachers arc offered more authors and more selections than they will probably use in any one course); second, to make the anthology self-sufficient by featuring many works in their entirety along with extensive selections for individual authors; third, to balance traditional interests with developing critical concerns in a way that points to a coherent American literary history. As early as 1979, we anthologized work by Anne Bradstreet, Mary Rowlandson, Sarah Kemble Knight, Phillis Wheatley, Margaret Fuller, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Frederick Douglass, Sarah Orne Jewett, Kate Chopin, Mary E. Wilkins Freeman, Booker T. Washington, Charles Chesnutt, Edith Wharton, W. E. B. Du Bois, and other writers who were not yet part of a standard canon. Yet we never shortchanged writers like Franklin, Emerson, Whitman, Hawthorne, Melville, Dickinson, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, and Faulkner, whose work students expected to read in their American literature courses, and whom teachers then and now would not think of doing without. Although the so-called canon wars of the 1980s and 1990s have subsided, they initiated a review of our understanding of American literature that has enlarged the number and diversity of authors now recognized as contributors to the totality of American literature. The traditional writers, who look different in this expanded context, also appear different according to which of their works are selected. Teachers and students remain committed to the idea of the literary-that writers strive to produce artifacts that are both intellectually serious and formally skillful-but believe more than ever that writers should also be understood in relation to their cultural and historical situations. In endeavoring to do justice to these complex realities, we have worked, as in previous editions, with detailed suggestions from many teachers and, through those teachers, the students who use the anthology. Thanks XVII xvlll PREFACE TO THE EIGHTH EDITION to questionnaires, comment cards, face-to-face and phone discussions, letters, and email, we have been able to listen to those for whom this book is intended. For this Eighth Edition, we have drawn on the careful commentary of over 200 reviewers. Our new materials continue the work of broadening the canon by representing J3 new writers in depth, without sacrificing widely assigned writers, many of whose selections have been reconsidered, reselected, and expanded. Our aim is always to provide extensive enough selections to do the writers justice, including complete works wherever possible. To the 34 complete longer texts already in the anthology-among them Hawthorne's The Scar· ...
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