Chapter 10, Test Review - Chapter 10 1 Test Review Section 1 Jacksons inauguration was a big and rowdy event Jackson aroused powerful feelings pro and

Chapter 10, Test Review - Chapter 10 1 Test Review Section...

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Chapter 101Test ReviewSection 1Jackson’s inauguration was a big and rowdy eventJackson aroused powerful feelings, pro and conPro: His supporters viewed his election as the advent of genuine democracy, the coming to power of the “common man”Cons: Critics considered him a tyrant. They called him King andrew IWhig party: Created to oppose Jackson. they borrowed their name, the Whig Party, from the opponents of royal power in the eighteenth-century EnglandAndrew Jackson’s career embodied the major developments of his era - the market revolution, the westward movement, the expansion of slavery, and the growth of democracyJackson was a symbol of the self-made man. Unlike previous presidents, he rose from a humblebackgroundJackson’s military campaign against the British and Indians helped to consolidate American control overthe Deep South, making possible the rise of the Cotton KingdomAndrew Jackson symbolized one of the most crucial features of national life - the triumph of political democracyAmericans pride themselves on being the world’s oldest democracyIn nineteenth century, democracy meant male suffrageDemocracy became part of the definition of American nationality and the American idea of freedomThe market revolution and territorial expansion were intimately connected with a third central element of AMerican freedom - political democracyPolitical democracy - the challenge to property qualifications for voting. Began during the American revolution, and reached its culmination in the early nineteenth centuryNot a single state that entered the union after the original 13 had property qualificationsInsistent pressure from men who didn’t meet property qualifications did much to democratize American politicsNon-Freeholders: Landless menTHe personal independence necessary in the citizen now rested not on ownership of property, but on ownership of one’s self - a reflection of the era’s individualismThe lone exception to the trend toward democratization was Rhode Island, which required voters to own real estate or rent propertyA center of factory production, Rhode Island had a steadily growing population of propertyless wage earners unable to voteDorr War: In October 1841, proponents of democratic reform organized a People’s Convention in Rhode Island, which drafted a new state constitution. It gave all white men voting rights and took voting rights from all blacks. It was ratified in an extralegal referendum and Thomas Dorr, aprominent lawyer, was appointed governor. President John Tyler dispatched federal troops to the state, collapsing the movement and imprisoning DorrThe Dorr War demonstrated passions aroused by continuing exclusion of any group of white men from voting, and the legislature soon eliminated the property qualifications for native born men, black and whiteAmerican politics were boisterous, highly partisan, and sometimes violent
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