jane - Tenido 1 Kyla Tenido Professor Michael North English 91C 1 November 2016 Jane Eyre Finding Commonalities Uncommon to Most Its a common trope to

jane - Tenido 1 Kyla Tenido Professor Michael North English...

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Tenido 1Kyla TenidoProfessor Michael NorthEnglish 91C1 November 2016Jane Eyre: Finding Commonalities Uncommon to MostIt’s a common trope, to disguise a self-actualizing development with an overarchingromantic driving force. Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyresucceeds in doing so—creating twoseparate character developments that intricately intertwine with one another to create a romancebuilt upon concessions and compromise. The main protagonist, Jane, undergoes a societal changewithin herself changing from Jane Eyre to Mrs. Rochester. Opposite her, Edward Rochesterphysically transforms to accommodate the imbalance between his and Jane’s nature of existence.Despite living contrary lives, their spiritual compatibility seemingly prevails other trials throughacts of change in both characters. Bronte illustrates such a dynamic through impeccable back-and-forth dialogue, character foils, as well as supernatural guidance.Jane’s dismissal of submission and Rochester’s balanced attitude in her presence isthoroughly exemplified through the back-and-forth dialogue between the two characters. In thebeginning, Jane was clearly suppressed under the authority of her aunt, Mrs. Reed as well asunder her school teachers like Miss Scatcherd. She was made to feel insignificant and her mindwas thoroughly belittled by those around her except for a select few. It wasn’t until sheencountered Mr. Rochester where her character was finally given a level playing field, in termsof mentality, allowing her to fully express her own intricate thoughts and go back and forth withsomeone without the fear of being dismissed or degraded. This goes for Mr. Rochester as well.Before he met Jane, he was used to being mentally dominant in comparison to the societal class
Tenido 2around him. To him, people like Mrs. Fairfax and especially Blanche Ingram are incapable ofintellectually challenging him. Those in his social rank are more preoccupied with outwardlyappearances of beauty and with wealth and riches. They lack original thought and are thought tobe followers of the herd. Hence, when Rochester first meets Jane, he is very standoffish, trying toprove himself worthy of his dominant status, both socially and intellectually. When Jane iscourageous enough to retaliate with quick snips and a sharp mind, he drops it. When asked if shethought he was handsome she quickly replies, “No” but further explains that she really believesthat “beauty is of little consequence” (248). Here, we see a significant change in Rochester’sattitude. He finds her mind fascinating and begins to treat Jane as an equal, which is a crucialfactor in their relationship. They prove to the readers and to each other that they weren’t ascomplete when they were apart, however, being of the same “kind”, together they strengthen oneanother and allow themselves to fully explore their inner workings and mentalities. The dialoguebetween the two creates such a dynamic where neither social class nor beauty can dictate how

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