Mass Determinations - 1.MassDeterminations Objective...

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1. Mass Determinations Objective Students will use laboratory balances to become acquainted with and knowledgeable  about their capabilities and restrictions. Summary of Procedure Obtain several small objects to determine their mass. Find and weigh a small beaker,  which will hold the objects to whose mass will be determined. Transfer first unknown  object to beaker, find combined masses, then the mass of the unknown object, record  both results. Repeat for remaining objects. Use a different balance and repeat instructions above.  Conclusions Using a triple beam balance and an electric balance to weigh the same objects gave us the opportunity to see the differences in their precision. Although small, the variances ranged from 0.092g to 0.01g. 2. The Use of Volumetric Glassware Objective Experiment and become familiar with different physical measurement instruments found  in the lab. Volumetric glassware will simultaneously be used to understand their function  and restrictions.  Summary of Procedure A. Graduated Cylinder a. Examine three cylinders filled with different amounts of colored water  (10-mL, 25-mL, 50-mL, 100-mL). Observe the cylinder’s smallest scale  mark. After doing so, clean a 25-mL graduated cylinder and a 50-mL  beaker, then weigh and record the mass of each to the nearest milligram.  Put 100 mL of distilled water into an Erlenmeyer flask, record temperature of water. Fill the graduated cylinder until the 25 mL mark with distilled  water. Do the same with the 50-mL beaker. Again, weigh graduated  cylinder and beaker to the nearest milligram and calculate the mass of  water each contains. Use Density of Water table to calculate volume of  water present in each. Compare calculated volume of water to observed  volumes observed from the marks on the cylinder and beaker; calculate  percent difference between calculated volume and observed volume from  the calibration marks. B. The Pipet
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a. Obtain and clean a 250-mL pipet and 150-mL beaker, and a rubber safety  bulb. Weigh empty beaker to nearest milligram, record. Determine weight  and temperature of 100 mL of distilled water in Erlenmeyer flask, record.  Pipet 25 mL of distilled water from flask into beaker. Reweigh this beaker  and determine weight of water transferred by the pipet. Use Density of  Water table to calculate volume of water transferred. Compare calculated  volume to volume of pipet.
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  • Fall '15
  • villareal
  • Chemistry, ml, Nikon Coolpix S2, Nikon Coolpix S1, KHP, Nikon Coolpix S3

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