DATUK_JAGINDAR_SINGH_&_ORS_v_TARA_RAJARATNAM - Page1 \/1983\/Volume2\/DATUKJAGINDARSINGH&ORSvTARARAJARATNAM[1983]2MLJ19616May1983 14pages[1983]2MLJ196

DATUK_JAGINDAR_SINGH_&_ORS_v_TARA_RAJARATNAM - Page1...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 18 pages.

Malayan Law Journal Reports/1983/Volume 2/DATUK JAGINDAR SINGH & ORS v TARA RAJARATNAM - [1983] 2 MLJ 196 - 16 May 1983 14 pages [ 1983] 2 MLJ 196 DATUK JAGINDAR SINGH & ORS v TARA RAJARATNAM FC KUALA LUMPUR LEE HUN HOE CJ (BORNEO), SALLEH ABAS CJ (MALAYA), & ABDOOLCADER FJ FEDERAL COURT CIVIL APPEAL NOS 215, 216, 291 AND 292 OF 1982 10 January 1983, 11 January 1983, 12 January 1983, 13 January 1983, 14 January 1983, 15 January 1983, 18 January 1983, 19 January 1983, 20 January 1983, 16 May 1983 Legal Profession -- Solicitor-client relationship -- Transfer of land -- Outright sale or security -- Fraud -- Breach of trust -- Undue influence -- Breach of agreement -- Damages Land Law -- Transfer of land -- Whether outright sale or security -- Fraud -- Valuation -- Evidence of expert -- National Land Code, s 340(2) Contract -- Fraud -- Undue influence -- Damages -- Contracts Act, 1950, s 16 & 24 In this case the respondent, the registered proprietor of land alleged that she was induced by the fraud and undue influence of the 1st and 2nd appellants to transfer the land to the 2nd appellant. The respondent claimed that when the land was transferred it was transferred as a security and there were two undertakings, (1) that the land would not be sold to anyone for one year without the consent of the respondent (2) that the land would be transferred back to the respondent on her repaying the $220,000/- within one year. Contrary to these undertakings the 2nd appellant some eighteen days later transferred the property to the 3rd appellant. Subsequently the land was again transferred to a land development company almost wholly owned by the 1st appellant. The land was eventually subdivided and sold to the public. The appellants were advocates and solicitors. The learned trial judge found that the appellants were guilty of fraud, breach of agreement and undue influence ( [1983] 2 MLJ 127). The appellants appealed. Held : (1) in this case it was clear from the correspondence that the 1st and 2nd appellants were acting for the respondent and there was a solicitor-client relationship between them; (2) on the evidence the learned judge was entitled to take the view that the appellants were not honest in that the 1st and 2nd appellants never really intended to fulfil the conditions of the agreement and that all they wanted was to get the respondent to sign the transfer form so that they could lay their hands on the property. As regards the 3rd appellant he colluded with the other appellants to get possession of the property; (3) the learned trial judge was correct in holding that the agreement was a security agreement and did not constitute an outright transfer of the land; (4) the learned trial judge was not wrong in holding that the transaction was unconscionable and that the burden was on the appellants to rebut the presumption of undue influence; (5) in this case the learned trial judge exercised his discretion correctly in awarding damages for fraud and in not deducting the sums paid by the appellants in payment of overdrafts to the banks as the sums were paid in pursuance and furtherance of the fraud. Cases referred to Page 1
Image of page 1
Image of page 2

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 18 pages?

  • Fall '16
  • jane
  • Law, Land, Misrepresentation in English law, MLJ, Datuk Jagindar Singh

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture