Week 10 MTE

Week 10 MTE - WEEK 10: FOREIGN TRADE AGREEMENTS / U.S. AND...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
WEEK 10: FOREIGN TRADE AGREEMENTS / U.S. AND THE WTO Odell and Eichengreen “The U.S., the ITO, and the WTO” 6.1  Analyzes issues that led to ratification of the WTO (Uruguay ’94) after  failing to  ratify the ITO (Havana ‘50)  6.1/6 The Exit Option –  Best alternative to signing, ratifying, and complying with  an  agreement by negotiating in different institution or pursing regional  liberalization  GATT was more valuable institutional alternative in the 40s than in the 90s  (more on this later)   support for WTO, but not ITO No regional alternative to achieve trade-related goals in either period  6.1/5 Agent Slack , a.k.a.  principal-agent problem  (comes up again in Week  11) Trade negotiators agents of congress; congress agents of interests groups In the ITO negotiations: State Dpt. negotiating agents prioritized international support for  liberalization over domestic support (consistent w. wartime planning and  Congressional delegation of tariff-setting under RTAA) Made concessions at the Havana conference that were unacceptable to  domestic interest groups, and failed to gain their support In the WTO negotiations: Principals instructed negotiating agents earlier, more often, more precisely   agents educated congress and moved their preferences closer to  provisions that could be negotiated internationally   terms of Uruguay  Round package closer to Congress’s ’94 preferences Reductions in agent slack made possible by institutional changes to  making trade decisions, which congress did by:  o Taking authority away from the State Dpt. and giving it to the  US Trade  Representative  (briefly mentioned here) in 1962  Now the lead agency in trade policy is separate from other foreign  policy responsibilities Body that monitors and oversees negotiation and ratification  process on behalf of congress
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
o Creating the  Private Sector Advisory Committee  for Trade  Negotiations in the Trade Act of 1974 43 citizens appointed rep all social sectors including labor and  consumers (though management dominate in practice) 27 sectoral advisory committees of industry experts report to 3  committees on industry, labor, and agriculture Negotiators required to proved access to confidential info to these  constituents and designated congressional staff Private-sector advisers report to congressional committees and  publish an advisory opinion of final agreements Implications: reduces agent slack by increasing info on special- interest opposition to an issue o Making  “fast track ratification”  (probably introduced before Week 10)  – a modification of the RTAA made in 1974
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 7

Week 10 MTE - WEEK 10: FOREIGN TRADE AGREEMENTS / U.S. AND...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online