IAH 201 #3 - National Identity and Gender: An Introduction...

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National Identity and Gender: An Introduction Gender Definition o Socially constructed beliefs about what it means to have particular sex organs Gender throughout the world o Variations A 19 th -20 th century US middle class Separation of spheres o Male sphere: business and politics outside the home o Female sphere: nurturing children and husband inside the home o “cult of domesticity” Early 20 th century New Guinea, Indonesia Chambri society o Women were traders, controlled family economics, and took lead in courtship Yoruba society, Africa, mid-20 th century Women controlled food supply, accumulated cash, and traded Jewish society, Europe, 17-18 th centuries Women ran the family business Men stayed home and read Universals Central universal of sex: women are capable of reproducing and lactating Central universal of politics: there has not been no culture in which men do not have ultimate authority over women Difference between power and ability: Power-the ability to act effectively on persons or things Authority-the right to make a particular decision and to command obedience
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Range Authoritarian Egalitarian Gender and National Identity Gender roles (labor, sexuality, dress) can become international stages-places where nations define themselves Feminism Definition o Political ideology to create egalitarian society where women and men share equal authority Impact of Feminism o Rising tide of gender Feminism and national identity o Conferences, organizations, and networks as international stages Handmaid’s Tale It is a dystopia o Imaginary place or state in which the condition of life is extremely bad, marked by deprivation, oppression, or terror (the opposite of utopia) It was published in 1985-think about the book as document from the 1980s Women’s Movement in the U.S., 1867-1920 NWP Actions: o Suffrage parade, March 1913, in Washington, D.C. culminated in violent not when bystanders attached suffragists o Alice Paul unfolded banner “Mr. President, What Will you Do for Woman Suffrage?” in galled of Congress during President Wilson’s first address in 1916
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o January 1917, NWP began systematically to picket the White House: on day of Wilson’s second inauguration, 1,000 women marched around the White House o Summer/Fall 1917, more than 200 picketers arrested-half of them went to jail. When not classified as political prisoners, they went on hunger strikes and were force fed Successes of the Women’s movement o 19 th Amendment, 1920, Right to Vote Tying Up o The success of the 19 th amendment was a product of both a language of equality and language of difference: women used both to create change in the first wave of feminism o The tension between languages of difference and equality, however, would continue to haunt the feminist movement throughout the 20 th century Results of First Wave Feminism Successes o 19 th amendment, 1920
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This note was uploaded on 04/16/2009 for the course IAH 201 taught by Professor Dontknow during the Spring '05 term at Michigan State University.

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IAH 201 #3 - National Identity and Gender: An Introduction...

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