lab1 - Experiment 1: Accuracy, Precision, and Beer's Law...

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Experiment 1: Accuracy, Precision, and Beer's Law Name: Fletcher Dostie Partner's Name: Andrew Pak Experiment Performed: 1/12/09 Turned in: 1/20/09 “I commit to uphold the ideals of honor and integrity by refusing to betray the trust bestowed upon me as a member of the Georgia Tech community.”
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The true value of the mass of a penny is 2.500 g. The values obtained in the experiment were very close to this, with an average of 2.504 g and a standard deviation of 0.020 g. (A1) Based on the measured penny masses, the US Treasury's minting process was determined to be both very accurate and very precise. The values obtained from different balances were not the same, but very precise, with a standard deviation of 0.001 g. (A2) While inter-balance precision is very high, only one balance should be used throughout an experiment to minimize the small differences between balances. (A3) The penny mass data was subjected to a Q-test, which allowed one data point of 3.092 g to be deleted. Examination of the graduated cylinders showed that low volume graduated cylinders had
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This note was uploaded on 04/16/2009 for the course CHEM 1312 taught by Professor Bottomley during the Spring '07 term at Georgia Institute of Technology.

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lab1 - Experiment 1: Accuracy, Precision, and Beer's Law...

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