phys1bl lab3

phys1bl lab3 - Physics 1BL Circuits Spring 2009...

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Physics 1BL Circuits Spring 2009 1 Introduction In this lab you will use the knowledge you have gained about charges and how they move under the influence of electric fields to explore what conditions allow for charges to move around an electric circuit. You will connect wires, light bulbs, and batteries in different configurations to see which form functional circuits. You will determine what kinds of materials are required to form a functional circuit, and you will measure electrical potentials in the circuits you create. Finally you will examine a light bulb and a flashlight to see how they work. Pre-Lab: 1. Explain from an atomic viewpoint why charge is usually transferred by electrons as opposed to protons. 2. A negative charge ( q = –0.75 Coulombs) is placed above a floor that has a net positive charge. The floor creates a uniform electric field that has a magnitude of 50 N/C. (a) What is the magnitude and direction of the electric force on the negative charge? (b) If the charge is initially at a distance 2.8 m above the plane, what will the change in electric potential energy (in Joules) be if it is then moved to a distance 0.50 m above the plane (specify whether this change is positive/negative/zero)? 3. If a proton moved from a location with 20 V potential to a location with 10 V potential, would its potential energy increase or decrease? If an electron moved from a location with 20 V potential to a location with 10 V potential, would its potential energy increase or decrease? Explain. A: Batteries, Bulbs and Wires Below are diagrams of 10 different configurations of bulbs, wires, and batteries. Make a prediction about whether or not each configuration will result in the bulb lighting up. Make your prediction by yourself and note your prediction in the space provided on your lab manual. When all the members of the group at your lab table have finished, compare your predictions for each configuration with those of your lab partners. Explain your reasoning and come to a joint conclusion about which circuits will light the bulb. Note your joint predictions on the white board. Now, with the equipment available in the lab, try each of the 10 configurations shown illustrated below. Use the pieces of bare wire, and hold them in contact with the battery and bulb as the figures show. In each case note if the light bulb comes on. In your lab notebook, draw a diagram of all the configurations that result in the light bulb lighting . q
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Physics 1BL Circuits Spring 2009 2 #4 The tip of the bulb touches the positive end of the battery (but not the knob in the middle). A wire touches the metal side of the bulb and the negative end of the battery. Pred: Obs: #5 A single wire touches the positive end of the battery and the negative end of the battery. The tip of the bulb touches the middle of this wire. Pred:
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phys1bl lab3 - Physics 1BL Circuits Spring 2009...

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