Lecture8 - Lecture 5 Cost-Benefit Analysis The last of the five strategies for comparison of investment strategies is benefit/cost ratio This

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Lecture 5: Cost-Benefit Analysis The last of the five strategies for comparison of investment strategies is benefit/cost ratio . This method is commonly used for public planning, by national or local governments, rather than by individual companies. Although there are significant differences between planning in the public and private sectors, the benefit/cost ratio is neutral with respect to these differences, giving the same result as would the present worth or rate of return methods. Formally, the benefit/cost ratio is defined as the fraction Present worth of benefits/Present worth of costs If this ratio is greater than unity, the project should go ahead, otherwise not. One apparent pitfall in this method is some ambiguity in what should be considered a cost and what a benefit. For example, a project with startup costs C which generates annual revenue R and which must meet annual costs K could be described as having equivalent costs C + K(P/A,i,N) and equivalent benefits R(P/A,i,N) . So the B/C ratio would be R(P/A,i,N)/(C+K(P/A,i,N)) On the other hand, the same project could be considered as yielding an annual profit of P = R-K . This annual profit is certainly a benefit, so we could argue that the benefit/cost ratio should be (R-K)(P/A,i,N)/C But these two ratios are different, so how can we decide which to use? Fortunately, we don't need to decide. The only thing we care about is whether the ratio is greater than 1, and it can be shown that when one of these fractions meets that criterion, so does the other. This means that the benefit/cost ratio
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This note was uploaded on 04/16/2009 for the course ENSC 201 taught by Professor Dr.johnjones during the Fall '08 term at Simon Fraser.

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Lecture8 - Lecture 5 Cost-Benefit Analysis The last of the five strategies for comparison of investment strategies is benefit/cost ratio This

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