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Colour Perception - Colour Perception Module 1 Introduction...

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Colour Perception: Module 1: Introduction to Colour Perception: We see colours because of wavelengths of light That apple is red only because of our perception which is due to pathways from the retina to the brain Colour enables us to interpret the world more easily, tell the birds from the trees, and leaves from the fruit Colour’s purpose goes beyond aesthetics Module 2: Evolution of Colour Perception: Why and Who: Bulls don’t respond to red, but respond to movement Birds, fish, reptiles and insects have colour vision; only primates of all mammals have colour vision Primates are well suited to distinguish red and yellow from green backgrounds; helps with foraging for fruits in the bushes Important adaptation for distinguishing predators or prey against a background, determining a ripeness of fruit, richness of the soil Many animals see more colours than primates; birds can be more brightly coloured but not be noticed by predators; flowers for bees have different patterns that we see Module 3: Colour Mixing: Human eye processes colour information by mixing Need a few colour receptors whose activity can be combined in different proportions to make every colour Primary colours: the three colours that can be combined to make every colour in the spectrum, no colours can be mixed to make these three colours, they cannot be reduced to any other colours Subtractive colour mixing: every reflective surface absorbs the colours that it does not reflect , adding pigments together subtracts more wavelengths to produce different colours Blue marbles look blue because all wavelengths are being absorbed except for the blue ones White light prism Yellow filter (takes out the blue and purple) blue filter (removes red, orange and yellow) left with green light Primary colours are red, yellow and blue Each has a complementary colour; red green, yellow purple, blue orange Primary colour plus complementary colour equals brown Additive colour mixing: mixing of coloured lights; coloured lights add their dominant wavelength to the mixture, our visual system processes colour by adding the effects of different wavelengths together in our nervous system Additive mixing primary colours are red, blue and green
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