{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Development 2 - Development 2 Module 1 Introduction to the...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Development 2: Module 1: Introduction to the Interactionist Perspective: Which is more important as a child develops? Nature? Nurture? At one extreme, scientist believed that nurture was all important and  development was independent of genetic factors. A behaviourist Watson said,  “With proper environmental control and training, any individual can be made to  become a doctor, musician, athlete or even criminal.” Watson’s position was not  this extreme, but was a good example of the nurture position.  Other scientists believed that who you became was largely predetermined by  inherited genes and that environment had a minimal effect. So if you had  intelligent, good looking successful parents, how could you not be intelligent,  good looking and successful?  Canalization Principle:  genotype restricts the phenotype to a small number of  possible developmental outcomes An example is infant babbling: all infants babble at around the same age, making  similar sounds and demonstrating universal phonemic sensitivity independent of  the environment. It doesn’t matter if they are deaf or not, English or Korean, they  all fall the same developmental sequence when it comes to babbling. Only later  do cultural influences begin to shape the final phonemes needed for their  language.  Range-of-Reaction Principle:  genotype establishes a range of possible  responses to different kinds of life experiences The height example: the genotype for height is influenced by interaction with the  environment. Your final height will be influenced by access to sleep, nutrition and  exercise. However the potential range of your height across poor and best  environmental conditions is determined by genetics factors. Even under ideal  conditions, I probably would not have been WNBA height. Genes determine the  range of potentials for our different traits and the input from the environment will  determine how our genotype is expressed as a phenotype.  Just like the environment influences the expression of our genes, genes can also  influence the kinds of environments we seek out.  Passive genotype/environment Correlations: 
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern