VierlingStudyGuide06-Ex4

- Study Guide for Dr Vierlings material Each set of lecture notes typically has a set of learning goals or list of things you should know Pay

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Study Guide for Dr. Vierling’s material: Each set of lecture notes typically has a set of learning goals or list of things you should know. Pay attention to these. Often the chapter reading covered material that is not in the notes. You are not directly responsible for material not covered in the notes. In lecture I tried (don’t know if I succeeded) to focus more on basic principles and recurring themes, and did not go through every specific example in detail (for example every type of carbohydrate binding protein, every type of membrane channel, every type of DNA binding protein). Focus on material covered in class and in discussion and clicker questions. Material in the notes not specifically covered in class should be easy for you to understand (not memorize) in light of what you have learned. All of the figures used in the slides in the lecture notes were chosen carefully to represent a specific point. Therefore, you should try to understand the major points on each slide. If a figure looks totally foreign to you, look it up in the text to understand it. Throughout studying, try to find the connecting threads of biochemistry. That is, focus on understanding the common, basic energetic (thermodynamic and kinetic) principles and on the recurring chemical reactions and properties of functional groups. Hopefully you will recognize how information presented during the semester builds on itself. There are always some things to memorize, but if you consider them in a basic framework of thermodynamics, kinetic and chemical principles, many things fit together and are logical consequences of each other, meaning less memorization. Make sure you can do the homework problems without any trouble. This means you should be able to apply all the different equations we have covered to different types of problems and questions. This requires an understanding of how the equations relate to biochemical processes, not just how to plug in numbers! I have taken advantage of many websites and jmols during lecture. While it is not essential that you memorize any of these materials specifically, use them if they help you learn the basic principles or visualize a process better. They may offer a nice break from other parts of studying as well. LIPIDS AND MEMBRANES : 1. Write general structures for fatty acids, glycerol, triacylglycerols, and glycerophospholipids. Note the different charge properties of glycerophospholipids. Recognize the general structure of sphingolipids. Be able to describe the type of linkages attaching the various substituents to the glycerol or sphingosine backbone (ester, phosphate ester, amide, glycosidic bond, etc.) Recognize the general structure of the sterol nucleus and the structure of cholesterol. 2. Explain fatty acid short-hand nomenclature, e.g., how many carbons and double
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This note was uploaded on 04/17/2009 for the course BIOC 460 taught by Professor Ziegler during the Spring '07 term at University of Arizona- Tucson.

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- Study Guide for Dr Vierlings material Each set of lecture notes typically has a set of learning goals or list of things you should know Pay

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