Chapter 16 Slide

Chapter 16 Slide - BIO 205 Chapter 16 Fungi Characteristics...

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Unformatted text preview: BIO 205 Chapter 16 Fungi Characteristics of Fungi Fungi Share a Combination of Characteristics: Fungal life cycles involve a growth phase and reproductive phase Molds grow as long, tangled filaments of cells in visible colonies Yeasts are unicellular fungi Some forms are dimorphic, growing at filamentous molds or as unicellular pathogens Most fungi (except yeasts) exist as hyphae A mycelium is a thick mass of hyphae Fungal hyphae growing on a leaf Fungal cell walls are composed of chitin In many species, septa divide the cytoplasm into separate cells Hyphae containing many nuclei are considered coenocytic Fungi are heterotrophic Fungal Growth Is Influenced by Several Factors: Fungi take up nutrients through absorption Most fungi are aerobic Most fungi grow best at around room temperature Many fungi thrive at slightly acidic pH (pH 5-6) Mycorrhizae live in mutualistic symbiosis with plant roots They help take up water and minerals Fungal endophytes live in plant tissue, particularly leaves Myccorhizae surround the root of a Eucalyptus tree Sporulation occurs in fruiting bodies Asexual reproductive structures develop at the ends of specialized hyphae Many asexual spores (sporangiospores) develop in sacs called sporangia Sporulation Others produce unprotected spores (conidia) on conidiophores Conidiophores and conidia of Penicillium...
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This note was uploaded on 04/17/2009 for the course MIC 201 taught by Professor Lacroix during the Spring '08 term at Rhode Island.

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Chapter 16 Slide - BIO 205 Chapter 16 Fungi Characteristics...

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