Leadership II - Staff non-commissioned officers should set the example by maintaining their weight and body composition within established standards

Leadership II - Staff non-commissioned officers should set...

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Staff non-commissioned officers should set the example by maintaining their weight and body composition within established standards. Additionally, one of your leadership principles is to "know your Marines and look out for their welfare." Is it okay to wait until your Marines are out of standards before having them participate in a combat conditioning program, or is it better to conduct a program that helps your Marines maintain a healthy weight and body composition? As a staff sergeant, you should: • Provide your Marines information and assistance to modify their attitudes and behavior consistent with a healthy lifestyle. • Contribute to the health and well-being of your Marines by monitoring their weight, body composition, and military appearance. • Motivate your Marines to set the example by maintaining their weight and body composition within standards. • Ensure compliance through supervised oversight, remedial conditioning and seeking professional assistance for your Marines. It is not uncommon for Marines to experience weight gain and increased body fat as a result of decreased physical activity. Weight gain and increased body fat affect fitness levels through reduced stamina, speed, and endurance. Marines who exceed weight and body fat standards detract from the combat readiness of their unit. Marine Corps Body Composition and Military Appearance Program (MCBCMAP): The objective of the MCBCMAP is to ensure Marines comply with established body composition standards and present a suitable military appearance. MCO 6110.3 provides policy and guidance on the MCBCMAP. Marine Corps Physical Fitness Program (MCPFP): The objective of the MCPFP is to develop a comprehensive combat conditioning program that promotes health and fitness to ensure the combat readiness of all Marines. MCO 6100.13 provides policy and guidance on the MCPFP. The monitoring and enforcement of body composition program (BCP) and military appearance program (MAP) standards is a shared responsibility between the Marine and the command. MCO 6110.3 delineates the following roles and responsibilities. Commanders/Officers in Charge • Commanders/officers-in-charge (OICs) will enforce compliance with weight, body composition, and military appearance standards through development and uniform application of periodic assessments, assignment, and supervisory procedures. Per the order, the commanders or OICs must possess special courts-martial convening authority. • Commanders/OICs must ensure Marines receive a fair and impartial evaluation, including a medical determination to establish if excess weight or body fat is due to an underlying medical condition or associated disease. • Commanders will select and assign, in writing, a combat conditioning instructor (CCI) and/or a command physical training representative (CPTR). There are no prerequisites for CCI/CPTR assignment.
Executive Officers/Senior Enlisted Advisors • Executive officers evaluate officers for compliance with the military appearance program (MAP).

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