Lecture 19 – Mendelian Genetics – Monohybrid Cross

Lecture 19 – Mendelian Genetics – Monohybrid Cross

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Lecture 19 – Mendelian Genetics – Monohybrid Cross A. Gregor Mendel (fig. 11-1) - Lived in the early 1800s - Was a monk - Took plants and bred them (one plant he used was the Pea plant Genus and species name: Pisum Sativum - Some people see his results as bad because he threw away whatever didn’t fit into his patterns (tried to simplify what he was doing) Didn’t know about chromosomes or meiosis - The center of the pea plant is the female part Carpel - eggs - The pollen of the pea plant is the male part Stamen - sperm - The pea plant has both male and female parts It can self-fertilize but you can also transfer pollen from one plant to another to cross-breed 1. Principle of dominance - Every trait that you have (brown eyes, hair color, blood type) is determined by two genes Two genes a.k.a. alleles (1 pair) - In the heterozygous individual, if one of those genes is expressed, that is considered dominant The other gene is not expressed, it is considered recessive It used to be said that the dominant gene hides/masks the recessive gene. This is not considered true anymore, it’s just than one gets expressed and the other doesn’t 2. Principle of segregation
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- Mendel’s work occurred before science knew about homologous chromosomes
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This note was uploaded on 05/30/2008 for the course BS 130 taught by Professor Smith during the Fall '07 term at University of the Sciences in Philadelphia.

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Lecture 19 – Mendelian Genetics – Monohybrid Cross

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