test 3 day 3 - Advanced Principles—CCJ 3024 InstTutonal...

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Advanced Principles—CCJ 3024 Institutional Corrections Dr. Jodi Lane Fall 2016 Tuesday, October 25 (2 hours)
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Institutional Corrections Have 2 Big Components Jails Local Detain people awaiting trial Confine people convicted of misdemeanors and sentenced to less than one year Prisons State or Federal Incarcerate people convicted of felonies and serving more than one year
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JAILS: LOCAL, LESS THAN 1 YEAR SENTENCE
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Jails actually have a lot of functions—kind of a “ catch all Incarcerate people sentenced to less than 1 year Hold people awaiting trial pending transfer to another facility Juvenile institution, mental health facility, military facilities for contempt of court witnesses (if may not show up) until transferred to a state or Federal facility Or, because state or Federal facility is too full Readmit probation, parole, and bond violators/absconders Release convicted offenders back to community Bohm & Haley
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Three “ Generations ” of Jail Design First Generation linear , remote surveillance cells lined in rows/staff walk tier or catwalk wheel spoke or “ Y ” designs staff cannot always see inmates interaction through bars Source: Allen & Simonsen, 1998
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Three Generations of Jails Second Generation (built early 1980s) provide indirect surveillance staff don’t walk around cells, but stay in secure control booth bars replaced by security glass Verbal interaction infrequent Source: Allen & Simonsen, 1998
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New Generation ” or Third Generation Jails (built mid-late 1980s to present) place staff & inmates in housing unit (“pods”) Direct surveillance staff become inmate behavior “ manager rather than “monitor” (e.g., don’t just react, but shape) daily decision shifts from supervisor to line officers Source: Allen & Simonsen, 1998
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In June 2014, over 744k confined in jails. Number declined from 2008 (mostly in large jails over 1000 ). Jail inmates, Midyear 2014
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Jails are generally below capacity (not overcrowded overall) but varies by area. Total 84% capacity, about 890,500 total beds available Jail inmates, Midyear 2011 Big jails > 1000= 88% capacity Small jails < 50 = 64% Jail inmates, Midyear 2013
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Jail populations In the year 2013-2014, 11.4 people were admitted to jails. Jail populations turn over a lot People come and go Large jails = 49% turnover rate, smaller jails even higher turnover rate ( 104% ) 234 /100,000 people were in jail in June 2014 47% of inmates were in jails with over 1000 inmates Almost ½ in 10% of jails Jail inmates, Midyear 2011
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Most jail inmates were male ( 85% ). More whites (47%) than blacks (36%) and Hispanics ( 15% ) in jail. About 4200 juveniles in jail (0.8% of pop), most held as adults (charged as an adult, 90%) Most not convicted ( 62% ) Jail inmates, Midyear 2014
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About 16,384 ( 2.5 %) held for immigration reasons Jail inmates, Midyear 2014
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About 63,000 actually housed “ outside ” jail Weekend programs, electronic monitoring, day reporting, work programs, etc.
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