BRAE 213 wk 5

BRAE 213 wk 5 - Cal Poly BRAE 213 Professor Hazelwood May...

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Cal Poly BRAE 213 Professor Hazelwood May 14, 2008 Tissue Engineering of Skin Recent technologies coupled with biomedical research have allowed bioengineers to engineer tissues capable of resolving individual maladies. The crux of tissue engineering is to manipulate cells and materials to develop new functioning tissue to replace failed tissues (Hazelwood). Engineered tissues allow for nearly limitless possibilities ranging from skin to cartilage to neurons. Tissue engineering itself is rather difficult process. First, an appropriate cell donor must be found. Donors can range from the patient itself (Autologous) to cells that are isolated from an entirely different species (Xenogenic). In addition to finding an appropriate donor the cells must then be cultured in a lab, resulting in useable tissue. This process is rather time consuming as it may take upwards of a month. In addition to the large amount of time needed, if the cells are not cultured under proper biomechanical loading situations the process will be all for naught (USA Today Science). The first successful fabrication of artificial tissue, made available to the public,
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This note was uploaded on 05/30/2008 for the course BRAE 213 taught by Professor Hazelwood during the Spring '08 term at Cal Poly.

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BRAE 213 wk 5 - Cal Poly BRAE 213 Professor Hazelwood May...

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