Lysistrata - Buckner 1 Stephanie Buckner Carl Malm History...

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Buckner 1 Stephanie Buckner Carl Malm History 101 2 April 2007 Aristophanes’ Lysistrata The only comedies that were preserved and able to endure the Greek Golden Age were the plays of a wellborn Athenian, Aristophanes. Aristophanes plays were not simply comedies; they were also antiwar plays (Lualdi 70). He was not the first person to promote antiwar antics, but the fact that he wrote the first antiwar play may have played a part in his comedies surviving while others did not. Neuburg writes that Lysistrata is one of Aristophanes lewdest plays because the basic concept of the play is sex itself (xix). Aristophanes strategically uses comedy as a weapon to protest the war. The structure of this particular play is that the women on both sides will pose a sex strike and compel the men to abstain from from war and make peace (Neuburg xix). This play suggests that in this time period women, as in many years past, were viewed lower than men. The thought that women could control men through use of sex is a witty yet somewhat truthful statement that Aristophanes made. The idea that women might have the power to diffuse an international situation maintains it appeal even in today’s society (Neuburg xix). A salient point in Lysistrata ’s plot is that there are actually two plots. Although the more known of the two seems to be the sex strike there is a second plot in which the elder women are to seize state funds by capturing the Acropolis. Aristophanes possibly did this because younger
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Lysistrata - Buckner 1 Stephanie Buckner Carl Malm History...

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