Political and Social Issues Caused by the KKK Jungling (11) - POLITICAL AND SOCIAL ISSUES CAUSED BY THE KKK Presented to Mr Ryne Jungling Department of

Political and Social Issues Caused by the KKK Jungling (11)...

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POLITICAL AND SOCIAL ISSUES CAUSED BY THE KKK Presented to Mr. Ryne Jungling Department of History Mandan High School In fulfillment Of the Requirements of History 104 By Samantha Ell 6 May 2016
P a g e | 2 Imagine a society, in which there is no freedom, and everyone is judged based on their beliefs, or outer appearance. After the Civil War, this was the norm in America. Groups formed against other groups, and were aware of the tensions built between them. Post-Civil War was a time when people were not accepted for who they were. People were strong believers in their beliefs, and when others tried to voice their opinions or other beliefs, contrary to theirs, major conflicts would arise. One of the largest groups formed almost immediately after the Civil War; they call themselves the Ku Klux Klan. The KKK manifested their power greatly in the 1920s, and still to this day have an impact on society. Although the Klan was largest during the post-Civil War era, they originated far sooner than the twenties. The Klan first were organized in 1868, and were sometimes called “Invisible Empire of the South.” 1 After the Civil War, and during the Reconstruction the Ku Klux Klan resurfaced. ‘Coronel’ William Joseph Simmons saw a film, Birth of a Nation , and saw the Klansmen as great heroes. 2 William revived the Klan in 1915. He made the Klan a type of club, in which he accepted people once they took the oath, and paid the fee. 3 One that swore to the oath, must believe in it with all their heart and mind. 4 The oath said they believed in full Americanism and any foreigners would be punished. 5 And the Klan did just that. 1 1 2009. "Federal grand jury report on the Ku Klux Klan." Federal Grand Jury Report On The Ku Klux Klan 252. MasterFILE Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed April 19, 2016). 2 "The Ku Klux Klan in the 1920s." PBS: American Experience: TV's Most-watched History Series. Accessed April 18, 2016 res/general- article/flood-klan/. 3 Ibid 4 Ibid 5 John F. Wukovits. ed. "Intolerance in the 1920s." In The 1920s, 58-109. San Diego, CA: Greenhaven Press, 2000, 63.
P a g e | 3 The Klan exploded to over eight million member in just a few years. It became the thing everyone was doing. 6 The upper class was recruited into the Klan first. 7 Once they had a majority of the upper class, they started recruiting the middle class, and eventually some of the lower class. 8 The national leader, H. S. Ramsey, from Kansas City, Nebraska declared all lawyers, doctors, teachers, political figures, and even ministers stood together under the Ku Klux Klan oath. 9 Often time’s people would join not because they believed in the oath, but because they were judged because they had not joined.

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