atoc EXAM REVIEW - backward direction of the PGF The...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–31. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Cumulus
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Pressure decreases with altitude
Image of page 2
Cumulus- look like cauliflower Produce thunderstorms- cumulonimbus Layered and widespread- stratus If precipitation from stratus occurs they are nimbostratus Cumulus-clouds with vertical development Cirrus- high in the sky Nimbus- produce rain Cirrostratus- high in the sky layered Cirrocumulus- high in the sky and puffy Middle clouds are altostratus and altocumulus
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
Fig  9.8
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Fig  9.4
Image of page 6
Fig  9.3
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Fig  9.2 Typical air masses over US prior to development of a cyclone.
Image of page 8
Chapter 9: Polar Front Theory Part 1: the Set-up
Image of page 9

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Dry Line: A front between moist and dry air (mT and cT)
Image of page 10
Image of page 11

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 12
Image of page 13

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 14
Image of page 15

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 16
Fig 7.12 Fig 7.13
Image of page 17

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 18
Meanwhile, back down in the friction layer, air converges into Low pressure and diverges from High (think “Beaker”)
Image of page 19

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 20
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: backward direction of the PGF. The Stratosphere puts an effective lid on the rising air in the Tropopause. So, near the tropopause, converging air must go down (sinking motion), and diverging air must draw air from below (rising motion). Convergence and Divergence Convergence – air flows towards a central point. Divergence – air flows away from a central point. The black lines show height of the 300mb surface A) shows that the pressure will be flat if the temperature remains constant from one region to the next. A) When the temperature does vary though it causes the pressure surface to slope downward from warm to cold air, so pressure goes down from the tropics to the poles. LOW HIGH LOW HIGH Two ways to draw upper level charts: Map the height at which the pressure is a certain value (say, 500 or 700 millibars) OR Map the pressure at a certain height (say, 5 km or sea level)...
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern