Fletcher_Writtenassignment_2 - Running head Souls of Black...

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Running head: Souls of Black Folk W.E.B. DuBois’ Souls of Black Folk Marcia D. Fletcher Apus Public University System 1
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Souls of Black Folk W.E.B. DuBois’ Souls of Black Folk There is no doubt that black culture is full of eloquent and intellectual writers. During the Reconstruction and Harlem Renaissance, many would arrive at the forefront of modern literature that would begin to unravel stereotypes and reframe the black experience of being human in every genre. But none were as sophisticated and truly committed to using every platform of writing available to him as W.E.B. Du Bois, who wrote purposely to speak to what it meant to be black: to live in black skin, and the psychology of being a black, even as an intellectual versus a non-intellectual black person. Du Bois could paint poetic pictures of living in economic, social and political deficiency and discriminatory neglect, reduced expediently in the eye of whites to insignificant shadows shunned to dark corners. As such, Du Bois developed numerous works, including two autobiographies, five novels and 16 nonfiction tomes which related his perspectives on the disenfranchisement, lynching’s, and the ever-present Jim Crow, however none is as highly acknowledged as Souls of Black Folk (Hine, Hine & Harrold, 2013, p. 408). With his offering of Souls of Black Folk , Du Bois, introduces and explains a sophisticated philosophy to all Americans and the world at large, the dual issue and psychological struggle of consolidating being black, and American while living in white America. Du Bois Souls of Black Folk has been most notably spoken about in terms of his break with Booker T. Washington. Du Bois made distinct remarks towards how the differences in their upbringing impeded the sort of freedom of thought he was able to have, and showed contempt for his perceived allegiance with whites in their agreement that blacks were not equal, or as valuable to require such equality. This was evidenced 2
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Souls of Black Folk in the way he limited his own endeavors in pursuit of higher education, and political and economic gains for all black people. This particular work of Du Bois became formally connected to the evolution of black culture. It has been identified as a precursor of the social revolution, the inception of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (N.A.A.C.P.), and a vision for how to confront and defeat the ‘color-line’ issue facing black Americans. Constructed of fourteen essays, and dialogue resonating
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