Democratic Theory and Regimes

Democratic Theory - Democratic Theory and Regimes Democratic Theory the"ideology of Democracy A What is democracy B Basic Premises fundamental

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Democratic Theory and Regimes Democratic Theory: the “ideology” of Democracy A. What is democracy? B. Basic Premises – fundamental premises to democratic theory that set it apart 1. Human equality a. Human beings are equal – contradicts divine right 2. Popular sovereignty a. Power emanates from the people 3. Social contract theory a. At some point in society a contract has been made for the common good – government is the result of that contract C. Three Variants 1. Hobbes / Burke and conservative democratic theory a. Accepts the basic premise of power emanating from the people b. People need order to enjoy freedom c. If there is no ruler it is a war between all, leading to chaos d. This theory is used as the justification of a government with an absolute authority figure e. But it also leaves room for challenging a monarch 2. Locke and classical liberalism a. Argues for a form of democratic government, specifically constitutional monarchy
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b. Government is ruled by the people (not all people though) - - Parliamentary government c.
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This note was uploaded on 06/01/2008 for the course PO 251 taught by Professor Perez during the Fall '07 term at BU.

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Democratic Theory - Democratic Theory and Regimes Democratic Theory the"ideology of Democracy A What is democracy B Basic Premises fundamental

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