lecture03 - 3 Errors in computation where do they come from...

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# 3 Errors in computation; where do they come from? L. Olson September 1, 2015 Department of Computer Science University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 1
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objectives look at floating point representation in its basic form expose errors of a different form: rounding error highlight IEEE-754 standard 2
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why this is important: Errors come in two forms: truncation error and rounding error we always have them . . . case study: Intel our jobs as developers: reduce impact 3
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example: calculating x = x + 0 . 1 4
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next: floating point numbers We’re familiar with base 10 representation of numbers: 1234 = 4 × 10 0 + 3 × 10 1 + 2 × 10 2 + 1 × 10 3 and . 1234 = 1 × 10 - 1 + 2 × 10 - 2 + 3 × 10 - 3 + 4 × 10 - 4 we write 1234.1234 as an integer part and a fractional part: a 3 a 2 a 1 a 0 . b 1 b 2 b 3 b 4 For some (even simple) numbers, there may be an infinite number of digits to the right: π = 3 . 14159 . . . 1 / 9 = 0 . 11111 . . . 2 = 1 . 41421 . . . 5
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other bases So far, we have just base 10. What about base β ? binary ( β = 2), octal ( β = 8), hexadecimal ( β = 16), etc In the β -system we have ( a n . . . a 2 a 1 a 0 . b 1 b 2 b 3 b 4 . . . ) β = n X k =0 a k β k + X k =0 b k β - k 6
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integer conversion An algorithm to compute the base 2 representation of a base 10 integer ( N ) 10 = ( a j a j - 1 . . . a 2 a 0 ) 2 = a j · 2 j + · · · + a 1 · 2 1 + a 0 · 2 0 Compute ( N ) 10 / 2 = Q + R / 2: N 2 = a j · 2 j - 1 + · · · + a 1 · 2 0 | {z } = Q + a 0 2 |{z} = R / 2 Example Example: compute (11) 10 base 2 11 / 2 = 5 R 1 a 0 = 1 5 / 2 = 2 R 1 a 1 = 1 2 / 2 = 1 R 0 a 2 = 0 1 / 2 = 0 R 1 a 3 = 1 So (11) 10 = (1011) 2 7
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the other way... Convert a base-2 number to base-10: (11 000 101) 2 = 1 × 2 7 + 1 × 2 6 + 0 × 2 5 + 0 × 2 4 + 0 × 2 3 + 1 × 2 2 + 0 × 2 1 + 1 × 2 0 = 1 + 2(0 + 2(1 + 2(0 + 2(0 + 2(0 + 2(1 + 2(1))))))) = 197 8
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converting fractions straight forward way is not easy goal: for x [0 , 1] write x = 0 . b 1 b 2 b 3 b 4 · · · = X k =1 c k β - k = (0 . c 1 c 2 c 3 . . . ) β β ( x ) = ( c 1 . c 2 c 3 c 4 . . . ) β multiplication by β in base- β only shifts the radix 9
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fraction algorithm An algorithm to compute the binary representation of a fraction x : x = 0 . b 1 b 2 b 3 b 4 . . . = b 1 · 2 - 1 + . . . Multiply x by 2. The integer part of 2 x is b 1 2 x = b 1 · 2 0 + b 2 · 2 - 1 + b 3 · 2 - 2 + . . . Example Example:Compute the binary representation of 0.625 2 · 0 . 625 = 1 . 25 b - 1 = 1 2 · 0 . 25 = 0 . 5 b - 2 = 0 2 · 0 . 5 = 1 . 0 b - 3 = 1 So (0 . 625) 10 = (0 . 101) 2 10
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a problem with precision 1 r 0 = x 2 for k = 1 , 2 , . . . , m 3 if r k - 1 2 - k 4 b k = 1 5 r k = r k - 1 - 2 - k 6 else 7 b k = 0 8 end 9 end k 2 - k b k r k = r k - 1 - b k 2 - k 0 0.8125 1 0.5 1 0.3125 2 0.25 1 0.0625 3 0.125 0 0.0625 4 0.0625 1 0.0000 11
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binary fraction example 12
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a problem with precision For other numbers, such as 1 5 = 0 . 2, an infinite length is needed. 0 . 2 . 0011 0011 0011 . . . So 0.2 is stored just fine in base-10, but needs infinite number of digits in base-2 !!! This is roundoff error in its basic form... 13
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numerical errors Roundoff Roundoff occurs when digits in a decimal point (0.3333...) are lost (0.3333) due to a limit on the memory available for storing one numerical value.
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