Physiology LO4 - Osteoarthritis, Diabetes etc

Physiology LO4 - Osteoarthritis, Diabetes etc -...

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Osteoarthritis non-healing ulcer
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Osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis among older people. The disease affects both men and women. Before age 45, osteoarthritis is more common in men than in women. After age 45, osteoarthritis is more common in women. Osteoarthritis is one of the most frequent causes of physical disability among older adults. Osteoarthritis occurs when cartilage, the tissue that cushions the ends of the bones within the joints, degenerates and breaks down and wears away. In some cases, all of the cartilage may wear away, leaving bones that rub up against each other. Other Known Osteoarthritis Risk Factors Osteoarthritis risk factors include: Excess weight or obesity - Obese women are four to five times more likely to have knee osteoarthritis than people of normal weight. Injury - Acute knee injuries are recognized as common causes of knee osteoarthritis. Certain occupations - Farmers, jackhammer operators, and mill workers have high rates of osteoarthritis.
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Hormones - Women who take oestrogen replacement therapy are not as likely to develop osteoarthritis as women who do not take oestrogen. Weak thigh muscles - Weak quadriceps can lead to osteoarthritis of the knees. Genetic factors - Genetics may impact the incidence of osteoarthritis. For example, heritability of hand osteoarthritis is about 65 percent. Race - Some reports suggest that African-Americans have higher rate of osteoarthritis than Caucasians. Other diseases which change cartilage structure - Rheumatoid arthritis may increase the risk of developing osteoarthritis. Low intake of vitamin C and D - Has been associated with increased risk of knee osteoarthritis.
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Symptoms of Osteoarthritis of knee Symptoms of Osteoarthritis of the knee may include: pain that increases when you are active, but gets a little better with rest. Swelling of the joint. feeling of warmth in the joint. stiffness in the knee, especially in the morning or when you have been sitting for a while. decrease in mobility of the knee, making it difficult to get in and out of chairs or cars, use the stairs, or walk.
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