Confidence Ogo - Ogo 1 Confdence Ogo US HIST 1302 November...

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Ogo 1 Confidence Ogo US HIST. 1302 November 6, 2015 Denmark Vesey Denmark Vesey was an African-American leader of an attempted slave insurrection in 1822. After many years as a slave, he won $1,500 in a lottery. Vesey used this money to purchase his freedom. He used his intelligence, energy, and luck to acquire considerable wealth and influence in South Carolina. All of these factors helped lead to the largest attempted slave revolt in American history. David Robertson's book Denmark Vesey outlines his life as a slave, to his freedom, to his execution, and the consequences of the aftermath. South Carolina was one of the only states in which the black slaves and abolitionists outnumbered their oppressors. Denmark Vesey's slave revolt consisted of over nine-thousand armed slaves, free blacks, and abolitionists, that would have absolutely devastated society in South Carolina for slave owners, and could have quite possibly been a major step towards the abolishment of slavery in the United states (James,56). Robertson succeeded in describing the harsh conditions of slaves in pre-civil war Charleston, South Carolina. This book also helped me to understand the distinctions between the different groups. These groups including the black slaves, free blacks, extreme abolitionists, and the pro-slavery communities. By 1708, the population of the colony of South Carolina was majority slave, reflecting the numerous African slaves imported to the state as laborers on the rice and indigo plantations. Exports of these commodity crops, and cotton from the sea islands, produced the wealth enjoyed by South Carolina's planters. This elite class controlled the legislature for decades after the
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Ogo 2 American Revolution. The state, the Low country and city of Charleston had a majority of the population who were slaves of African descent. By the late 18th century, slaves were increasingly "country born," that is, native to the United States. They were generally considered more tractable than newly enslaved Africans. Connections of kinship and personal relations extended between slaves in the city of Charleston and those on plantations in the Low country, just as those connections existed among the planter class, many of whom had homes and domestic slaves in both places.
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