BUAD 304 - Ethical Dilemma Hiring Based on Genetic Data

BUAD 304 - Ethical Dilemma Hiring Based on Genetic Data -...

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Ethical Dilemma Hiring Based on Genetic Data Do you think it’s ethical for employers to engage in genetic testing with the intent to screen for diseases or potential diseases? I feel that it depends on the nature of the job. If the diseases or potential diseases can directly affect job performance, then I think it is okay for employers to perform genetic testing. For example, if a person has a disease that impairs their working ability and can not carry out the necessary tasks, then this affects the company. Therefore, I feel that for the overall productivity of the company, genetic testing should be allowed. However, by the same token, I do not think that it is okay for employers to engage in genetic testing with the intent to screen for diseases or potential diseases if it does not affect job performance because I believe that in these cases, personal matters such as health should not be
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Unformatted text preview: considered in the hiring process because they have no bearing on the success of the company. Is it permissible, for example, to use a blood test to perform genetic testing on employees without their consent? What about with their consent? Is your answer any different if the genetic information is reasonably related to specific job performance? I do not think that it would be morally right to use a blood test to perform genetic testing on employees without their consent regardless of whether or not it affects job performance because it is their body and it should be their choice on whether or not to divulge that information. If they do give prior consent, then I feel that it is okay to perform the genetic testing on them. Regardless whether it affects their performance or not, if they give consent in the first place, obviously they have nothing to hide....
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This note was uploaded on 03/02/2008 for the course BUAD 304 taught by Professor Cummings during the Spring '07 term at USC.

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