Social Innovation syllabus new(1) - Nico Slate...

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Statistics for Management and Economics + XLSTAT Bind-in
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Chapter 19 / Exercise 19.136
Statistics for Management and Economics + XLSTAT Bind-in
Keller
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Nico Slate Baker Hall 365 [email protected] Office Hours: Mon. 2:30-3:30 Phone: 412-268-1408 and by appointment Global Histories: Innovation and Social Change History 79104, Fall 2016, Monday / Wednesday 12:30-1:20 or 1:30-2:20, Porter Hall 100 If you wanted to change the world, how would you do it? In this course, we will examine the history of efforts to create sustainable social change. We will focus on “social innovation,” broadly defined to include any creative effort to advance human progress. We will probe the successes and failures of social innovators who transformed the world. Key figures will include Andrew Carnegie, Mahatma Gandhi, Albert Einstein, Rosa Parks, and Rachel Carson. By learning from these social innovators, we will explore the relationship between individual innovators and large-scale economic, political, and cultural change. The world has become increasingly interconnected. To succeed in the twenty-first century, future innovators must be able to think and act across multiple borders. In order to examine the global impact of social innovation, we will track the movement of ideas and actions across time and space. Course Objectives By the end of this course, students will be able to… 1) Abstract general models of innovation and social change from specific historical cases and critique the limitations of such models 2) Construct a historically informed cost-benefit analysis of a particular social innovation 3) Assess competing explanations of the origins and impact of innovation 4) Compare the impact on innovation of individual characteristics (talent, creativity, determination, etc.) and of social identities (race, class, gender, etc.) 5) Identify the strengths and weaknesses of historical sources 6) Craft historical arguments based on both primary and secondary sources 7) Communicate historical arguments via analytical, evidence-based writing 8) Assess the relationship between social innovation and major global processes 9) Compare social innovations and social movements across time and space Course Texts We will savor short selections from a range of books, articles, films, and historical documents. In reading and discussing these texts, our goal will be to better understand the history of social innovation, and to probe how historians use evidence to craft arguments and narratives. You do not need to buy any books for this course . Socialchange101.org Some of our course materials are available via a free on-line course, socialchange101.org, that was developed to complement this course.
We have textbook solutions for you!
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Statistics for Management and Economics + XLSTAT Bind-in
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 19 / Exercise 19.136
Statistics for Management and Economics + XLSTAT Bind-in
Keller
Expert Verified
Learning Activities and Evaluation This course includes three short papers (3-4 pages each), a weekly recitation, occasional quizzes, a variety of small creative in-class projects, and a final paper (6-8 pages). I will provide further details on these assignments over the course of the semester.

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