PHM 2204 Lecture 8

PHM 2204 Lecture 8 - PHM 2204 David Copp Fall, 2007 WHY...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
PHM 2204 Fall, 2007 David Copp WHY SHOULD WE HAVE A STATE? See PP, ch. 2 1. What are States? Two characteristics: a state (1) claims sovereignty and exercises sovereignty (2) over a relatively fixed territory – that is, it claims to be, and to have the right to be, the final authority and final source of binding law in the territory, and claims to be and to have the right to be independent of any external authorities, and it prosecutes these claims. (these rights are typically (at least tacitly) claimed to be moral rights, and not merely rights in (international) law.) 2. Other forms of political society * non-territorial government over a “people” – e.g. Roman Catholic canon law could be understood this way – Robert Nozick’s private protective agencies. * government that does not claim sovereignty – e.g. “divine right of kings” 3. The “State of Nature.” * see Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679), John Locke (1632-1704) * the “state of nature” is a hypothetical situation where people live in a society
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 05/31/2008 for the course PHM 2204 taught by Professor Copp during the Fall '07 term at University of Florida.

Page1 / 2

PHM 2204 Lecture 8 - PHM 2204 David Copp Fall, 2007 WHY...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online