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Skip to main content You are logged in as Kwendo Alex ( Log out ) Page path Home / ► Courses / ► PURE AND APPLIED SCIENCES / ► Chemistry / ► SCH100 / ► Topic 6 / ► Bonding Though the periodic table has only 118 or so elements, there are obviously more substances in nature than 118 pure elements. This is because atoms can react with one another to form new substances called compounds. This compounds are formed when two or more atoms chemically bond togetherto form compounds that are unique chemically and physically from their parent atoms. For example. The element sodium is a silver-colored metal that reacts so violently with water that flames are produced when sodium gets wet. The element chlorine is a greenish-colored gas that is so poisonous that it was used as a weapon in World War I. When chemically bonded together, these two dangerous substances form the compound sodium chloride, a compound so safe that we eat it every day - common table salt! Ionic bonding In ionic bonding , electrons are completely transferred from one atom to another. In the process of either losing or gaining negatively charged electrons, the reacting atoms form ions. The oppositely charged ions are attracted to each other by electrostatic forces, which are the basis of the ionic bond.Ionic bonds occurs when atoms with large differences in electronegativity values combine. For example, during the reaction of sodium with chlorine:
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sodium (on the left) loses its one valence electron to chlorine (on the right), resulting in a positively charged sodium ion (left) and a negatively charged chlorine ion (right).
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  • Fall '15
  • Atom, Electrons, Chemical bond, Kwendo Alex

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