student - Spring 2008 Physics 112 Student Handbook Erich...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Spring 2008 Physics 112 Student Handbook Erich Mueller Jan 11, 2008 2 About this Document Overview This document summarizes what you can expect from P112, and what is ex- pected from you. Revision History This document was created on Jan 11, 2008. It is subject to revision. Such changes will be announced. 3 4 Chapter 1 Goals of P112 We would like every student taking P112 to excel. We would like to share our enthusiasm with them and teach them about the world around. We hope to provide a fun and stimulating environment in which you can develop problem solving techniques, and critical thinking skills. Physics is about taking the complex phenomena of the physical world and developing models which allow us to quantify them. This modeling involves making approximations and then backing out the abstract scaffolding which is underneath. This is a fun an exhilarating process. In this course we will use kinematics (the study of motion) and dynamics (the study of why things move) as a context to carry out this model building. This provides a concept rich environment for problem solving and developing proficiency at working with models. Many of you are pursuing a degree in engineering. Aspects of mechanics forms the foundation for many engineering disciplines. Similarly physics is a basic subject which sheds light on most of the other sciences. 5 6 CHAPTER 1. GOALS OF P112 Chapter 2 Course Structure 2.1 Overview As illustrated in figure 2.1, P112 has a richly layered set of activities. This enables us to connect with students who have wildly different learning styles. As of Jan 3, 2008, we have roughly 300 students enrolled, 13 teaching staff members committed, and the course will involve roughly 10 additional support staff (whose duties extend to other courses). Our students come with a wide variety of backgrounds, and have a wide variety of goals. They all are unique individuals, and we hope to have enough flexibility in the course to engage all of them. 2.1.1 A student-eye view of P112 P112 students attend three 50 minute lectures each week. Each lecture is given twice: once at 10:10am, and a second time at 12:20pm. The students also attend two 50 minute recitation sections each week and over the course of the 14 week semester will attend eight laboratory sessions, each one nominally 2 hours long. Students must be registered for each of these three components of the course. They are free to attend either lecture – even if they are registered for the other. They must, however, register for the lab and recitation section that they are attending. The students are evaluated on their performance in lab, and they will be required to hand in a “prelab” sheet at the beginning of lab. They will be assigned weekly homework and take weekly quizzes. Generally homework will not be handed in, but the quiz problems will be taken directly from the home- work (possibly with numbers changed). We firmly believe that students have the potential to be the best judge of how to most efficiently spend their time,...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 06/01/2008 for the course PHYS 1112 taught by Professor Leclair,a during the Spring '07 term at Cornell.

Page1 / 18

student - Spring 2008 Physics 112 Student Handbook Erich...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online