Joe - Either as Joe or as Jim first identify the issues and...

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Either as Joe or as Jim, first identify the issues and parties to the conflict and negotiation Issues and Parties Our readings tells us that successful negotiations start with good preparation and as we examine the elements of a successful negotiation, we should think about a negotiation currently confronting us. These elements which are shown in exhibit 11-1 is said to be thought starters. This exhibit addresses the issues and the parties involved (Griffith & Goodwin, 2013, pg. 180). Issue. The issue is defined as the statement of the central issue or problem you need to negotiate, as you understand it (Griffith & Goodwin, 2013, pg. 180). The issue at hand is that Joe is feeling overwhelmed with life right now. He is having a difficult juggling work, school, and his home life. On top of all these troubles, he is expecting another child. He feels overworked, he doesn’t have enough time to help around the house, and he worries that his studies are suffering with the lack of time he has. Joe would like to ask Jim to decrease his hours during this time so he can catch up on his work and deal with his family situation, but Jim actually needs Joe to work extra during this busy work season. Parties. The party or parties is defined as others who may need to be consulted regarding any proposed agreement (Griffith & Goodwin, 2013, pg. 180). The party with whom Joe needs to negotiate in this matter is his boss, Jim Talent. Assessing Your BATNA and Theirs The acronym for BATNA is best alternative to a negotiated agreement. Knowing your BATNA is knowing your walk-away point which is central to effective bargaining. Having a good BATNA is the key to having power and having a weak BATNA verses the other party provides the knowledge of when to agree to a proposal. (Griffith & Goodwin, 2013, pg. 181).
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Joe. Here are some thought starter questions Joe could ask himself: What is the outcome I aspire to realize as a result of the negotiations? What type of outcome would I be content with? If I absolutely had to, could I live with the following outcome? (Griffith & Goodwin, 2013, pg. 182). Jim. Here are some thought starter questions Jim should ask himself: What would I want if I was Joe? If I were Joe, what is the least that I would accept? (Griffith & Goodwin, 2013, pg.
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