APUSHDBQ - Kripa Mathew DBQ To what extent did the American Revolution fundamentally change American society In your answer be sure to address the

APUSHDBQ - Kripa Mathew DBQ To what extent did the American...

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Kripa Mathew DBQ: To what extent did the American Revolution fundamentally change American society? In your answer be sure to address the political, social, and economic effects of the Revolution in the period from 1775 to 1800. During 1775 to 1800 in the United States, the American Revolution arose as a significant turning point in American society. Prior to the American Revolution, the colonists felt that England was attempting to control them. The British tried to enforce multiple laws and taxes after the French and Indian war without the consent of the colonies causing the colonists to become enraged. The colonists’ lack of representation and movements including the Enlightenment and the Great Awakening inspired colonists to declare independence from Britain. The American Revolution fundamentally changed American society politically, socially, and economically in an effort to create an ideal society. The political effects primarily involved a changing government. The social effects involved greater freedom for women and slaves. To a lesser extent, there was change in the economic future of American society. Politically, Americans experienced a changing government in order to grant the people their natural liberties while maintaining a strong centralized government. Many Americans wanted to create a government different from Britain because they viewed British rule as tyrannical. Patriots spread ideas of equality thus attacking Tories who weren’t in favor of the American Revolution. For example, The Pennsylvania Packeteditorial of 1779 calls for America to be a land for freemen only and to banish Tories (loyalists) for their opposition to independence. The 1776 Declaration of Independence inspired these beliefs of equality because it established the colonies independence from Great Britain and enforced the idea that “all men are created equal.” Although the Native Americans fought on the side of the British during the war, they wanted an alliance with the United States once the war ended. For instance, the Message to Congress from the Chickasaw Chiefs in July 1783 discusses the Native Americans’ desire for peace and friendship with the United States, even calling them

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