Ch09-oceancirculation-grsn-text

Ch09-oceancirculation-grsn-text - Chapter 9 Circulation of...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
9 Chapter Circulation of the Ocean   MAIN CONCEPTS Ocean water circulates in currents caused mainly by wind  friction at the surface and by differences in water mass density  beneath the surface zone. Surface currents affect the uppermost 10% of the world ocean,  mostly above the pycnocline. Some surface currents are rapid  and riverlike, with well-defined boundaries; others are slow and  diffuse. The largest surface currents are organized into huge  circuits known as gyres. Water near the ocean surface moves to the right of the wind  direction in the Northern Hemisphere, and to the left in the  Southern Hemisphere.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
9 Chapter Circulation of the Ocean   The Coriolis effect modifies the courses of currents, with  currents turning clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and  counterclockwise in the Southern Hemisphere. The Coriolis  effect is largely responsible for the phenomenon of westward  intensification in both hemispheres. Upwelling and downwelling describe the vertical movements of  water masses. Upwelling is often due to the divergence of  surface currents; downwelling is often caused by surface  current convergence or an increase in the density of surface  water. El Niño, an anomaly in surface circulation, occurs when the  trade winds falter, allowing warm water to build eastward across  the Pacific at the equator.
Background image of page 2
9 Chapter Circulation of the Ocean   Circulation of the 90% of ocean water beneath the surface zone  is driven by gravity, as dense water sinks and less dense water  rises. Since density is largely a function of temperature and  salinity, the movement of deep water due to density differences  is called thermohaline circulation. Water masses almost always form at the ocean surface. The  densest (and deepest) masses were formed by surface  conditions that caused water to become very cold and salty. Because they transfer huge quantities of heat, ocean currents  greatly affect world weather and climate.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
9 Chapter Circulation of the Ocean   Currents are the very heart of physical  oceanography. Their global effects, vast masses of  water, complex flow, and possible influence on  human migrations make their study of particular  importance.
Background image of page 4
9 Chapter Circulation of the Ocean   The surface layer moves with a velocity no more than 3% of the  wind speed. The energy of the wind is passed through the water 
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 20

Ch09-oceancirculation-grsn-text - Chapter 9 Circulation of...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online