Replacement Behavior and Intervention Plan for Chad - DRI...

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DRI: Chad Replacement Behavior and Intervention Plan for Chad Grecia Gaviria Capella University Incompatible/Alternative Replacement Behavior When challenging behavior fall within the positive reinforcement function it is important to teach an appropriate replacement behavior that has the same positive outcome for the individual and will replace the challenging behavior. Efficient replacement behavior should have the same function as the challenging behavior, promote independence, expand student’s repertoire and maximize his participation at home, school and the community (Chandler & Dahlquist, 2010; Cooper, Heron & Heward, 2007; Riley, McKevitt, Shriver & Allen, 2011). The Chad’s case study in Chandler and Dahlquist (2010) text describes an 8-year-old boy that was presenting challenging behaviors in his regular education classroom. Chad has the 1
DRI: Chad diagnosis of emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD), speech disorder and seizure disorder. He receives various services in and out of the classroom and does well in reading and math. Chad’s increased challenging behaviors lead his teacher to refer him for a functional assessment and behavior support plan. Positive reinforcement was identified as the function of Chad’s challenging behavior through observations that documented antecedent and consequences related to his behavior in the classroom. As the function of Chad’s challenging behavior is maintained by attention an appropriate replacement behavior that has the same outcome must be taught (Chandler & Dahlquist, 2010). A differential reinforcement of incompatible (DRI) behavior procedure should be implemented as part of Chads behavior plan. DRI reinforces appropriate behavior that is incompatible with the challenging behavior (Chandler & Dahlquist, 2010; Cooper, Heron & Heward, 2007). In other words, only behaviors that cannot occur simultaneously with the challenging behavior are reinforced. In Chad’s case a behavior that is incomparable with shouting is to quietly raise his hand. For Chad’s off-task behavior (tapping pencil, making noises with body, falling out of chair) an appropriate incompatible behavior would be any on-task behavior (reading, completing seatwork, participating in group activities etc.). Since the function of Chad’s challenging behavior is to receive attention, praise should be delivered every time Chad is engaging in the appropriate replacement behavior. When implementing the DRI Chad will not get reprimanded for shouting or engaging in off-task behavior (extinction) instead the teacher should attend and give praise when Chad engages in appropriate replacement behavior.

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