Poetry_Terms - Poetry Terms Accent when a syllable is given...

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Poetry Terms Accent: when a syllable is given a greater amount of force in speaking than is given to another; also called a stress Allegory: a narrative in either verse or prose in which characters, events, and in some cases setting represent abstract concepts apart from the literal meaning of the story Alliteration: the repetition of consonant sounds at the beginning of words Allusion: an indirect reference to a person place or thing—fictitious, historical, or actual Anapest: a metrical foot consisting of three syllables, two unaccented followed by one accented Anaphora: the repetition of the same word or phrase at the beginning of several successive clauses, verses, or paragraphs Apostrophe: a figure of speech in which a character or narrator directly addresses an abstract concept, an inanimate object, or a person who is not present Assonance: the repetition of similar vowel sounds in stressed syllables or words Ballad: a narrative song or poem passed on orally Blank verse: verse written in unrhymed iambic pentameter Caesura: a light but definite pause within a line of poetry Chiasmus: a rhetorical device in which words or phrases initially presented are restated in reverse order; for example, “do not live to eat, but eat to live.” Conceit: an elaborate, extended, and often surprising comparison made between two very dissimilar things that exhibits the author’s ingenuity and cleverness Concrete poem: a poem in which the visual arrangement of the letters and words suggests its meaning Connotation: the emotional associations that surround a word, as opposed to its denotation Consonance: the repetition of consonant sounds that are preceded by a different vowel Couplet: two successive lines of verse that have the same meter and in many cases rhyme Dactyl: a three-syllable metrical foot consisting of a stressed syllable followed by two unstressed syllables Denotation: the literal meaning of a words—its “dictionary definition” that does not take into account any other emotions or ideas the reader may associate with it Dialect: variety of language spoken by a social group in a certain locality that differs from the standard speech in pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammatical form Diction: the author’s choice of words and phrases; involves both denotation and connotation Didactic poetry: poetry whose purpose is to teach the reader some kind of lesson

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