Ch11-tides-grsn-text

Ch11-tides-grsn-text - Chapter 11 Tides MAIN CONCEPTS Tides...

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11 Chapter Tides   MAIN CONCEPTS Tides are huge shallow-water waves—the largest waves in the  ocean. Tides are caused by a combination of the gravitational  force of the moon and sun and the motion of Earth. The moon’s influence on tides is about twice that of the sun’s. Gravitational attraction and inertia cause the ocean surface to  bulge. Tides occur as Earth rotates beneath the bulges
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11 Chapter Tides   Because wave speed is proportional to wavelength, tides move  rapidly through the ocean, up to 1,600 kilometers (1,000 miles)  per hour. Tides have such long wavelengths that they are always in  “shallow water” (in water that is shallower than one twentyth of  their wavelength). The  equilibrium theory  of tides deals primarily with the position  and attraction of Earth, moon, and sun. It assumes that the  ocean conforms instantly to the forces that affect the position of  its surface, and only approximately predicts the behavior of the  tides.
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11 Chapter Tides   The  dynamic theory  of tides takes into account the speed of the  long-wavelength tide wave in water of varying depth, the  presence of interfering continents, and the circular movement or  rhythmic back-and-forth rocking of water in ocean basins. It  predicts the behavior of the tides more accurately than the  equilibrium theory. Tidal patterns—the heights and arrival times of tide crests—at a  continent’s edge may be semidiurnal (twice daily), diurnal  (daily), or mixed depending on local combinations of gravity,  inertia, and basin shape.
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11 Chapter Tides   Tides caused by the interaction of the gravity of the sun, moon,  and Earth are known as astronomical tides. Meteorological  tides, caused by weather, can add to or detract from the height  of tide crests. The rise and fall of the tides can be used to generate electrical  power, and tides are important in many physical and biological  coastal processes.
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11 Chapter Tides   Tides have a wave form, but differ from  other waves because they are caused by the 
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Ch11-tides-grsn-text - Chapter 11 Tides MAIN CONCEPTS Tides...

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