Ch14-plankton-grsn-text

Ch14-plankton-grsn-text - Chapter 14 PLANKTON, ALGAE, AND...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
14 Chapter PLANKTON, ALGAE, AND PLANTS MAIN CONCEPTS The term plankton is a description of a lifestyle, not a collective  natural category. Members of the plankton may be large or  submicroscopic, and include many plantlike species and nearly  every major group of animals. Phytoplankton—drifting photosynthetic autotrophs—are among  the world’s most important primary producers. Two groups, the  diatoms and the dinoflagellates, account for most oceanic  productivity.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
14 Chapter PLANKTON, ALGAE, AND PLANTS Primary productivity is measured directly using radioactive  tracers or light-dark bottle experiments. Many factors can limit primary productivity. Chief among these  is lack of light and lack of nutrients. The compensation depth is the depth above which  photosynthetic production of carbohydrate exceeds  consumption of carbohydrate by the producer itself. The  compensation depth defines the bottom of the euphotic zone.
Background image of page 2
14 Chapter PLANKTON, ALGAE, AND PLANTS On a total annual basis, primary productivity is greatest in the  temperate zone, near shore. The greatest productivity at any one  time occurs around the Antarctic in local summer. Zooplankton—drifting heterotrophs—are the most abundant  consumers in the ocean. 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Chapter PLANKTON, ALGAE, AND PLANTS Seaweeds, a form of marine algae, are efficient primary  producers, but collectively account for only a small percentage  of total marine productivity.   Seaweeds are classified by pigments into chlorophytes,  phaeophytes, and rhodophytes.  Algin, a substance derived from seaweeds, is of considerable  commercial importance. The most abundant marine angiosperms (true plants) are 
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 06/01/2008 for the course ESCI 261 taught by Professor Soong during the Spring '08 term at Millersville.

Page1 / 20

Ch14-plankton-grsn-text - Chapter 14 PLANKTON, ALGAE, AND...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online