Week6_2 - Electric and Magnetic Fields An electric field...

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1 Electric and Magnetic Fields ± An electric field surrounds any stationary electric charge ± The region of space surrounding a moving charge includes a magnetic field ± In addition to the electric field ± A magnetic field also surrounds any material with permanent magnetism ± Both fields are vector fields
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2 Magnetic Poles ± Every magnet, regardless of its shape, has two poles ± Called north and south poles ± Poles exert forces on one another ± Similar to the way electric charges exert forces on each other ± Like poles repel each other ± N-N or S-S ± Unlike poles attract each other ± N-S
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3 Magnetic Poles, cont ± The poles received their names due to the way a magnet behaves in the Earth’s magnetic field ± If a bar magnet is suspended so that it can move freely, it will rotate ± The magnetic north pole points toward the earth’s north geographic pole ± This means the earth’s north geographic pole is a magnetic south pole ± Similarly, the earth’s south geographic pole is a magnetic north pole
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4 Magnetic Poles, final ± The force between two poles varies as the inverse square of the distance between them ± A single magnetic pole has never been isolated ± In other words, magnetic poles are always found in pairs ± There is some theoretical basis for the existence of monopoles – single poles
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5 Magnetic Fields ± A vector quantity ± Symbolized by ± Direction is given by the direction a north pole of a compass needle points in that location ± Magnetic field lines can be used to show how the field lines, as traced out by a compass, would look B r
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6 Magnetic Field Lines, Bar Magnet Example ± The compass can be used to trace the field lines ± The lines outside the magnet point from the North pole to the South pole
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7 Magnetic Field Lines, Bar Magnet ± Iron filings are used to show the pattern of the magnetic field lines ± The direction of the field is the direction a north pole would point
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8 Magnetic Field Lines, Unlike Poles ± Iron filings are used to show the pattern of the magnetic field lines ± The direction of the field is the direction a north pole would point ± Compare to the electric field produced by an electric dipole
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9 Magnetic Field Lines, Like Poles ± Iron filings are used to show the pattern of the magnetic field lines ± The direction of the field is the direction a north pole would point ± Compare to the electric field produced by like charges
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10 Definition of Magnetic Field ±
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Week6_2 - Electric and Magnetic Fields An electric field...

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