Week3_2 - Quiz reminder Quiz next Wednesday 8:00am 8:50 am...

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1 Quiz reminder ± Quiz – next Wednesday 8:00am – 8:50 am ± Refer to course website for exam location ± No make-up quiz! ± 1 conceptual and 2 numerical problems ± Coverage: Chapter 19 ± Preparation: concentrate on L, R and HW problems as well as textbook examples; read the textbook ± Student help center for PHYS102 is open. ± 915 Disque Hall ± Hours: 10am-5pm M,Tue,W,Thu
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2 Electric Potential ± The potential energy per unit charge, U/q o , is the electric potential ± The potential is independent of the value of q o ± The potential has a value at every point in an electric field ± The electric potential is o U V q
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3 Work and Electric Potential ± The electric potential at an arbitrary point due to source charges equals the work required by an external agent to bring a test charge from infinity to that point divided by the charge on the test particle ± Assumes a charge moves in an electric field without any change in its kinetic energy ± The work performed on the charge is W = Δ V = q Δ V
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4 Units ± 1 V = 1 J/C ± V is a Volt ± It takes one Joule of work to move a 1 Coulomb charge through a potential difference of 1 Volt ± In addition, 1 N/C = 1 V/m ± This indicates we can interpret the electric field as a measure of the rate of change with position of the electric potential
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5 Electron-Volts ± Another unit of energy that is commonly used in atomic and nuclear physics is the electron- volt ± One electron-volt is defined as the energy a charge-field system gains or loses when a charge of magnitude e (an electron or a proton) is moved through a potential difference of 1 volt ± 1 eV = 1.60 x 10 -19 J
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6 Potential Difference in a Uniform Field ± The equations for electric potential can be simplified if the electric field is uniform: ± The negative sign indicates that the electric potential at B is lower than at point A BB BA AA VV V d E d s E d −= Δ = ⋅= = ∫∫ Es r r
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This note was uploaded on 06/02/2008 for the course PHYS 102 taught by Professor N/a during the Spring '08 term at Drexel.

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Week3_2 - Quiz reminder Quiz next Wednesday 8:00am 8:50 am...

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