elimination of hinfluenzab

elimination of hinfluenzab - Progress Toward Elimination of...

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3/1/08 11:47 AM Progress Toward Elimination of Haemophilus influenzae Type b Invasive Disease Among Infants and Children --- United States, 1998--2000 Page 1 of 7 http://www.cdc.gov/MMWR/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5111a4.htm Weekly March 22, 2002 / 51(11);234-7 Progress Toward Elimination of Haemophilus influenzae Type b Invasive Disease Among Infants and Children --- United States, 1998-- 2000 Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) was the leading cause of bacterial meningitis and a major cause of other serious invasive diseases among children aged <5 years in the United States before Hib conjugate vaccines became available in 1988 ( 1,2 ). In 1991, all infants starting at age 2 months were recommended to receive Hib conjugate vaccines; by 1996, incidence of Hib invasive disease (i.e., illness clinically compatible with invasive disease, such as meningitis or sepsis, with isolation of the bacterium from a normally sterile site) among children aged <5 years had declined by >99% ( 1, 3 ). This report presents 1998--2000 Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) surveillance data, which indicate that the incidence of reported Hib invasive disease remains low. Achieving the national health objective for 2010 of reducing to zero indigenous Hib invasive disease cases in children aged <5 years ( 4 ) will require improved age-appropriate vaccination of children, complete reporting of vaccination and relevant medical histories, standardization of the serotyping procedure, and complete ascertainment and reporting of serotype for all Hi invasive disease cases. In 1991, Hi invasive disease became a nationally notifiable disease. State health agencies, the District of Columbia, and New York City provide weekly reports of provisional cases of Hi invasive disease to CDC through the National Electronic Telecommunications System for Surveillance (NETSS) and the National Bacterial Meningitis and Bacteremia Reporting System (NBMBRS). Case reports include demographic data about persons with Hi invasive disease and supplemental information (e.g., the serotype that caused the illness, type of clinical illness, outcome, and Hib vaccination history). States were contacted to obtain and confirm supplemental data for cases of Hi invasive disease in children aged <5 years with onset in 1998, 1999, and 2000. Only Hib vaccine doses given > 14 days before illness onset were considered valid. Annual population estimates for 1998 and 1999 from the U.S. Census Bureau were used to calculate incidence rates. CDC also coordinates the Active Bacterial Core surveillance (ABCs) system with sites in selected states. Illnesses identified as Hi invasive disease (i.e., isolation of H. influenzae from a normally sterile site in a resident of the surveillance area) are reported to CDC and the various state health departments ( 3 ). During 1998--2000, project personnel contacted all microbiology laboratories serving acute care hospitals in each surveillance area every 2--4 weeks; specimens were sent to CDC for serotype confirmation. The population of children aged <5 years in the surveillance areas
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This note was uploaded on 05/24/2008 for the course EPIM 7000 taught by Professor V during the Spring '08 term at University of Georgia Athens.

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elimination of hinfluenzab - Progress Toward Elimination of...

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