Japanese immigration to the United Stateshas occurred for over a hundred years

Japanese immigration to the United Stateshas occurred for over a hundred years

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One of the boldest displays of racial profiling is President Roosevelt’s decision to create Japanese internment camps. During WWII, the bombing of Pearl Harbor created assumptions of Japanese spies working against the United States. During this time, the Japanese citizens were more discriminated against compared to Italian and German citizens. President Roosevelt’s decision to create Japanese Internment camps was a shameless and dishonorable act. America’s slogan as the land of the free was extremely contradicted through these actions. It’s been over a hundred years since the first Japanese immigrants. During the Meiji Restoration from 1868 to 1912, Western nations came to Japan in hopes of establishing diplomatic and trade relations. This led to internal political conflict between powerful leaders which made Japan began a course of modernization that involved mainly industrial and military growth (Ng, p.2). A law that required all males to join the military service made many Japanese men emigrate abroad. The surges of Japanese immigrants to the U.S in 1885 were mainly from southwestern Japan. They worked in low-skilled, physically demanding jobs in areas of California and Oregon. It was then in 1907 that President Roosevelt negotiated the “Gentlemen’s Agreement” that lead to immigration restrictions in response to anti-Japanese groups who wanted to halt emigration from Japan (Ng, p.3). This was the first of many racial actions carried out by President Roosevelt. In 1880 there were 148 Japanese living in the United States and by the eve of WWII, there were 285,115(Ng, p.3). The Japanese Americans were divided into three different generations. It was first the Issei, who were the pioneer generation of Japanese
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Americans. Then, the Nisei, a group that grew up in two worlds, both Japanese and American. Lastly was the Sansei, the third generation that consisted of mostly kids. At the time, many Japanese immigrants were living with scrutiny and discrimination. An Anti-Japanese movement created tension and hostility towards Asian immigrants. The Japanese were being stereotyped as a group that was a threat on the security of the United States. This is what led to Roosevelt’s shift from being infatuated with Asia to adopting an “increasingly wary position toward Japanese power” (Robinson, p.11). As a result, Theodore Roosevelt anticipated war with Japan for over a year due to political issues and dramatization from people around him. One of the main resources responsible for Roosevelt’s attitude towards the
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This note was uploaded on 06/03/2008 for the course WRTG 1150 taught by Professor Jones,bris during the Spring '07 term at Colorado.

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Japanese immigration to the United Stateshas occurred for over a hundred years

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