Lab Report Micro 3051- Gram Stain

Lab Report Micro 3051- Gram Stain - Introduction In 1884 a...

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Introduction In 1884, a man by the name of Christian Gram was able to produce a way for most bacteria to be separated into groups based on the colors they produced, after the procedure was complete. His procedure was called the Gram stain (Woolverton, et al. 36). Gram stain is known as a type of differential staining procedure that divides bacteria into gram-positive and gram-negative groups based on their ability to retain crystal violet when decolorized with an organic solvent such as ethanol (Woolverton, et al. 36). Before the Gram stain is able to happen correctly the culture must be heat fixated to the slide as shown in lab. The first step in the Gram stain procedure is to stain the heat fixated smear with a basic crystal violet dye, that is known as the primary stain (Woolverton, et al. 36). The primary stain or crystal violet dye will stay on the smear for 20 seconds, and then a rinse of water for about two seconds until there is no leftover violet dye on the slide (“Exercise 14” 39). As told in lab, use caution when rinsing not to squeeze water onto the slide too aggressively. After the first wash of water comes the flooding of iodine onto the slide for 1 minute (“Exercise 14” 39). Iodine is the substance that is used as a mordant, or material that binds the dye to the target material (Woolverton, et al. 37). After the iodine sits on the smear for 1 minute, the next step is to decolorize by washing the slide with alcohol until the solvent drips colorless. (“Exercise 14” 39). Decolorization is
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