phil3 - Philosophy 101 Exam Three Study Guide(11 am Exam...

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Philosophy 101 Exam Three Study Guide (11 am) Exam Two is scheduled on Wed, April 6, in class. Exam Two will consist of 50 multiple choice questions (no short answer question). Please bring a green scantron (#882) and a #2 pencil. · Chapter 6 pp. 78-81 (only last few pages on Kant’s theory about the death penalty) · Blackboard Reading #7 on John Rawls (6 pages) · Blackboard Reading #8 on Robert Nozick (4 pages) · Blackboard Reading #9 on David Gelernter (3 pages) DEATH PENALTY & KANT (Chapter 6 pp. 78-81) 1. In Kant’s view, who has the right of administering punishment? According to Kant, can the future good of the criminal or of society justify punishment? Should a criminal who agrees to medical experimentation for scientific research be allowed a reduced punishment? Administering punishment o The right of administering punishment is the right of the sovereign as the supreme power to inflict pain upon a subject on account of a crime committed by him. Justify punishment o Judicial punishment can never be administered merely as a means for promoting another good either with regard to the criminal himself or to civil society, but must in all cases be imposed only because the individual on whom it is inflicted has committed a crime. For one man ought never to be dealt with merely as a means subservient to the purpose of another. . . · No but no death penalty, life in prison o What, then, is to be said of such a proposal as to keep a criminal alive who has been condemned to death, on his being given to understand that, if he agreed to certain dangerous experiments being performed upon him, he would be allowed to survive if he came happily through them 2. How does executing a murderer show respect for him as a rational person according to Kant? How has a murderer authorized his own death? Kant claims that we should treat criminals as a rational agent and equal to others. Because of the categorical imperative that says our actions should be applied as universal law, when a murderer kills someone, he is agreeing that other can take away his life too. “In committing the act of murder, the murderer has given permission to everyone to take away his life” 3. What would Kant view to be the appropriate punishment for a wealthy man who commits slander? What does Kant think to be the fitting punishment for a person who steals? In Kant’s view, how should rape, pederasty and bestiality be punished? Slandering another person o The man should retract his statement, apologize and kiss the hand of the victim Person who steals Take away his property o Hard labor to earn his right to stay alive o Be treated like a slave Rape and Pederasty o Castration Bestiality
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o Permanent expulsion from civil society because criminal is unworthy of human society RAWLS (Blackboard Reading #7 on John Rawls, 6 pages 4. What is the difference between distributive justice- socially just allocation of goods in a society and retributive justice- Punishment must be proportionate to the crime committed . What is Aristotle’s principle of distributive justice?
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