Unit I - 1 According to Macionis(2011 the social-conflict...

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1. According to Macionis (2011), the social-conflict approach rises from an arena of inequality that generates conflict and change (p. 12). How does the social-conflict approach relate to counterculture? What sort of examples can you give in which a culture developed out of a feeling of inequality, or as a means to belong to a group? Social-conflict approach demonstrates how factors such as class, ethnicity, gender, and age are related to inequality associated to money, power, education, and social prestige (Macionis, J.J. 2011, p. 12). For example, a lower income family living in poverty will not have exposure to a solid education compared to a white collar family who has their children attend private school. More opportunities may be available to a student who attends a private school verse a student who attends an inner city school. For example, an inner city school may not have available resources like books, computers, or supplies. Social-conflict approach and countercultures can be related. Both groups can have a sense of inequality that will generate conflict in society. Countercultures are very common. This is where a group feels strongly opposed of mainstream society. The group then forms a subculture where members share the same beliefs or norms with each other. For decades counterculture has been exhibited in and out of the United States. Terrorist, feminist groups, the hippie movement, bikers, and some computer hackers are examples of some countercultures. As we evolve some people grow out of these groups. Having a strong feeling of inequality can sometimes turn into violence. Reference Macionis, J.J. (2011). Society: The basics (11 th ed.) Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall. 2. Within the study of sociology, there are four different types of research methods. Briefly describe in your own words, and generate an example of each. The four different types of research methods within the study of sociology are experiments, surveys, participant observation, and the use of existing resources (Macionis, J.J. 2011, p. 22). An experiment is where a hypothesis is tested and evidence is gathered to determine whether or not the hypothesis is rejected or not. An example of an experiment is where a statement claiming boys with red hair sleep longer than other children without red hair. An experiment can be conducted where they select an equal number of participants, the same age, height, and weight to track data on their sleep patterns. Based on the results they can determine whether or not to reject the hypothesis. Surveys are handled much differently. This is where subjects respond to a series of questions or statements. Surveys target populations. One example is where subjects in Florida
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can be surveys to see what political party they will favor. Another research method is participant observation. This is where the subject agrees to be observed in their own environment. An example of this research is when a group of teens can be observed on camera to see how they react to bullying. The research enables the subject to react naturally and producing qualitative
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