{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

BLB11S - Chemistry 101 Prof Jerry Keister Chapter 11 1...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–13. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 11 1 Chemistry 101 Chemistry 101 Prof. Jerry Keister
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 11 2 Intermolecular Forces, Intermolecular Forces, Liquids, and Solids Liquids, and Solids Chapter 11 Chapter 11
Image of page 2
Chapter 11 3 A Molecular Comparison of Liquids A Molecular Comparison of Liquids and Solids and Solids Physical properties of substances understood in terms of kinetic molecular theory: Gases are highly compressible, assume shape and volume of container: Gas molecules are far apart and do not interact much with each other. Liquids are almost incompressible, assume the shape but not the volume of container: Liquids molecules are held closer together than gas molecules, but not so rigidly that the molecules cannot slide past each other. Solids are incompressible and have a definite shape and volume: Solid molecules are packed closely together. The molecules are so rigidly packed that they cannot easily slide past each other.
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 11 4 A Molecular Comparison of Liquids A Molecular Comparison of Liquids and Solids and Solids
Image of page 4
Chapter 11 5 A Molecular Comparison of Liquids A Molecular Comparison of Liquids and Solids and Solids Converting a gas into a liquid or solid requires the molecules to get closer to each other: cool or compress. Converting a solid into a liquid or gas requires the molecules to move further apart: heat or reduce pressure. The forces holding solids and liquids together are called intermolecular forces.
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 11 6 Intermolecular Forces Intermolecular Forces The covalent bond holding a molecule together is an intramolecular force. The attraction between molecules is an intermolecular force. Intermolecular forces are much weaker than intramolecular forces (e.g. 16 kJ/mol vs. 431 kJ/mol for HCl). When a substance melts or boils the intermolecular forces are broken (not the covalent bonds). When a substance condenses intermolecular forces are formed.
Image of page 6
Chapter 11 7 Intermolecular Forces Intermolecular Forces
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 11 8 Dipole Moments Dipole Moments 01 01 Polar covalent bonds form between atoms of different electronegativity . Polar bonds can be represented as having a positive end and a negative end. This is described as a dipole .
Image of page 8
Chapter 11 9 Dipole Moments Dipole Moments 02 02 Dipole Moment ( µ ): The measure of net molecular polarity. µ = Q × r Q = charge on either end of dipole and r = distance between charges Dipole moments are expressed in debyes ( D ) where 1D = 3.336 x 10 –30 coulomb meters (C·m) in SI units. The charge on 1 electron is 1.60 x 10 –19 C.
Image of page 9

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 11 10 Dipole Moments Dipole Moments 03 03 Polarity can be illustrated with an electrostatic potential map. These show electron–rich groups as red and electron–poor as blue–green.
Image of page 10
Chapter 11 11 Dipole Moments Dipole Moments 04 04
Image of page 11

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 11 12 Intermolecular Forces Intermolecular Forces 01 01 The attractive forces between molecules and ions.
Image of page 12
Image of page 13
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern