L6-Neural Connections

L6-Neural Connections - Sensory Processes & Perception...

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Unformatted text preview: Sensory Processes & Perception PSY 343 Spring Session 2007 - Lecture 6 Neural Connections Instructor: Sean Green Vision - Neural Connections Review So far we’ve learned: That neurons are connected to one another by synapses That when one neuron fires it can excite or inhibit other neurons connected to it That this allows neurons to carry information about the outside world Vision - Neural Connections Question for today How do we describe neural connections in a way that helps us understand what they do? One answer – Neural circuits Neural circuits are groups of neurons connected by synapses Vision - Neural Connections Representing Neural Connections When modeling visual perception, scientists can represent neural circuits as lines connecting dots, like this The dots (called Nodes ) don’t have to be single neurons. Each one could represent the average activity of many neurons Excitatory Connection Inhibitory Connection Vision - Neural Connections Representing Neural Connections Then, we can indicate the activity of a node by giving it a number A very active node will have a larger impact on the activity of the receiving node Excitatory Connection Inhibitory 100 +10 110-10 90 100 Vision - Neural Connections Example 1: A simple circuit Here’s a simple circuit Receptor Stimulus With this circuit, you can tell when light hits the receptor, because the neuron will be more active Vision - Neural Connections Example 2: Another simple circuit You can also use an inhibitory connection Receptor Stimulus In this case, you could tell that a stimulus was present because the neuron was less active Vision - Neural Connections Example 3: A slightly more complicated circuit Let’s suppose you want to tell whether a stimulus is coming from the left or the right Receptor Receptor If we set up our circuit like this: Then the neuron in the middle will fire faster when the stimulus comes from your left and slower when it comes from your right Vision - Neural Connections Receptive Fields We have lots of receptors A single neuron or group of neurons will only be connected to some of them The location of the receptors that influence the firing of a particular neuron is called its receptive field Receptors Receptive field...
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This note was uploaded on 06/05/2008 for the course PSY 343 taught by Professor Green during the Fall '07 term at SUNY Buffalo.

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L6-Neural Connections - Sensory Processes & Perception...

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