Lecture3_19thCent - Lecture 3: The International System th...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture 3: The International System th in the 19 Century April 4, 2008 Interaction Before 1914 Politics: Balance of power, British supremacy, imperialism Economy: free trade, globalization, gold standard + nationalism Politics Congress of Vienna(1815) Concert of Europe British supremacy Industry Navy Empire Conservative monarchs sought to hold back liberal and nationalist trends Enshrined balance of power Britain would "flip" to weaker side Imperialism Economy Free trade Low tariffs Low government intervention Driven by manufacturers People, goods, capital Technological advances Globalization "For...the middle and upper classes...life offered, at a low cost and with the least trouble, conveniences, comforts and amenities beyond the compass of the richest and most powerful monarchs of other ages. The inhabitant of London could order by telephone, sipping his morning tea in bed, the various products of the whole earth, in such quantity as he might see fit, and reasonably expect their early delivery upon his doorstep... He could secure forthwith, if he wished, cheap and comfortable means of transit to any country or climate without passport or other formality." John Maynard Keynes, 1920 Economy Free trade Low tariffs Low government intervention Driven by manufacturers People, goods, capital Technological advances Globalization Gold Standard Nationalism The belief that a nation should have a state Nation: a group with common identity based on language, culture, history, myths, values In 19th century, began to break up empires Ethnic Composition of Austria Hungary, 1910 Ethnicity Percentage German 24 Hungarian 20 Czech 13 Polish 10 Ruthenian [incl. Ukrainian] 8 Romanian 6 Croat 5 Slovak 4 Serb 4 Slovene 3 Italian 3 And then came war.. The 19th century system 18151914 R.I.P. ...
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This note was uploaded on 06/05/2008 for the course SIS 201 taught by Professor Scottradnitz during the Fall '08 term at University of Washington.

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