Lecture_26_Iraq - Lecture 26: Mission Accomplished May 30,...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture 26: Mission Accomplished May 30, 2008 Significance of 9/11 for International System End of "postCold War era" Graduation of nonstate actors into the system Symbolic strike for the "rest" against the "west" Radical attempt at USdominated order Enabled Iraq invasion Bush: War on Terror (To joint session of Congress, 9/20/01) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZMj9g6WRLfQ&eurl=http://video.google.com/videos Americans are asking, why do they hate us? They hate what we see right here in this chamber a democratically elected government. Their leaders are self appointed. They hate our freedoms our freedom of religion, our freedom of speech, our freedom to vote and assemble and disagree with each other. Americans should not expect one battle, but a lengthy campaign, unlike any other we have ever seen. It may include dramatic strikes, visible on TV, and covert operations, secret even in success. We will starve terrorists of funding, turn them one against another, drive them from place to place, until there is no refuge or no rest. And we will pursue nations that provide aid or safe haven to terrorism. Every nation, in every region, now has a decision to make. Either you are with us, or you are with the terrorists. (Applause.) From this day forward, any nation that continues to harbor or support terrorism will be regarded by the United States as a hostile regime. BushCheneyism: The 2002 National Security Strategy The United States possesses unprecedented-- and unequaled--strength and influence in the world. Sustained by faith in the principles of liberty, and the value of a free society, this position comes with unparalleled responsibilities, obligations, and opportunity. The great strength of this nation must be used to promote a balance of power that favors freedom. "Our Enemies" In the 1990s we witnessed the emergence of a small number of rogue states that, while different in important ways, share a number of attributes. These states: brutalize their own people and squander their national resources for the personal gain of the rulers; display no regard for international law, threaten their neighbors, and callously violate international treaties to which they are party; are determined to acquire weapons of mass destruction, along with other advanced military technology, to be used as threats or offensively to achieve the aggressive designs of these regimes; sponsor terrorism around the globe; and reject basic human values and hate the United States and On Preemption "In the Cold War...we faced a generally status quo, riskaverse adversary. Deterrence was an effective defense. But deterrence based only upon the threat of retaliation is less likely to work against leaders of rogue states more willing to take risks...To forestall or prevent such hostile acts by our adversaries, the United States will, if necessary, act preemptively." Gulf War I http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YENbElb5-xY&feature=related Containment of Iraq Making the Leap Neocons used 9/11 to sideline realists "Axis of Evil:" Iraq, Iran, North Korea, 1/02 States like these, and their terrorist allies, constitute an axis of evil, arming to threaten the peace of the world. By seeking weapons of mass destruction, these regimes pose a grave and growing danger. They could provide these arms to terrorists, giving them the means to match their hatred. They could attack our allies or attempt to blackmail the United States. In any of these cases, the price of indifference would be catastrophic. National Security Strategy, 9/02 Media campaign, fall 2002spring 2003 (http://www.publicintegrity.org/WarCard/) What Were They Thinking? Dictatorship terrorism Democracies peaceful, proUS Domino theory Democracy can come from invasion Intimidation of "evil" states Reputation Eliminate alQaeda's grievances ...
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This note was uploaded on 06/05/2008 for the course SIS 201 taught by Professor Scottradnitz during the Fall '08 term at University of Washington.

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