The_Iliad

The_Iliad - True Character of Achilles: The Helpfulness of...

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True Character of Achilles: The Helpfulness of Pride in Heroism Achilles was both blessed and cursed with one of the hardest personality traits to deal with: pride. Many viewed pride as the most sinful characteristic a human being could posses- it created disdain for others through superior feelings, and an unwillingness to be humble. At the same time, pride, especially in Ancient Greece and the era of Homer, was seen as a positive quality for warriors and leaders. It gave them courage and a sense of honor, two characteristics that were valued in Ancient Greece. Pride seemed to have both positive and negative effects on Achilles. He was a great Greek warrior, and therefore used his pride to become what Aristotle referred to as a “great-souled” man. In Nicomachean Ethics , Aristotle described a “great-souled” man as having power and wealth so as to gain himself honor. He willingly “[conferred] benefits, but he [was] ashamed of receiving them…” (IV: iii). This could have been viewed as the epitome of sinful pride. One should have been able to humble him or herself so as to be at the mercy of others and therefore couldn’t maintain dislike
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This note was uploaded on 06/06/2008 for the course HP 001 taught by Professor Behnegar during the Fall '07 term at BC.

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The_Iliad - True Character of Achilles: The Helpfulness of...

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